Apr 20, 2024  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Diagnostic Ultrasound

  
  • DIUS 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • DIUS 3960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
    See Instructor for course detail.

  
  • DIUS 4710 - Clinical Experience In Ultrasound I

    8 credit hours
    40 hours a week spent in an approved ultrasound clinical practice learning patient care, practical medical ethics, observing and performing ultrasound procedures and other diagnostic modalities. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all DIUS didactic courses and compliance with policy #81-4, Program Specific Requirements, and clinical preparatory activities.

    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 4870, DIUS 4880
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall,Winter
  
  • DIUS 4720 - Clinical Experience in Ultrasound II

    8 credit hours
    40 hours a week in an approved ultrasound clinical practice.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 4710 and compliance with policy #81-4 Program Specific Requirements
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 4870, DIUS 4880
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall & Winter
  
  • DIUS 4730 - Clinical Experience in Ultrasound III

    10 credit hours
    40 hours a week in an approved ultrasound clinical practice.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 4710, 4720 and compliance with policy #81-4 Program Specific Requirements
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 4870
  
  • DIUS 4740 - Clinical Experience in Ultrasound IV

    8 credit hours
    Forty (40) hours a week in an approved ultrasound clinical practice.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 4710, 4720, 4730 and compliance with policy #81-4, Program Specific Requirements
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 4870
  
  • DIUS 4870 - Ultrasound Seminar I

    2 credit hours
    Seminar to review and discuss cases performed by students and issues of professional interest. Seattle based students meet on campus one day every week. Students based outside Seattle area present projects by distance learning. Program requires this course be taken four times for a maximum of eight credits. Fulfills senior synthesis core requirement, together with DIUS 4880. Mandatory CR/F grading.

    Co-requisite Course(s): 4710, 4720, 4730 or 4740
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall Winter Spring Summer
  
  • DIUS 4880 - Basic Science of Ultrasound

    2 credit hours
    Project of professional interest assigned by faculty involving critical examination of current literature and research techniques. Program requires this course be taken twice for a maximum four credits. Fulfills senior synthesis requirement together with DIUS 4870.

    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 4710, 4720
  
  • DIUS 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours

Digital Cultures

  
  • DICE 3000 - Introduction to Digital Cultures

    5 credit hours
    This course is an introduction to the major. Students are familiarized with vocabulary and interdisciplinary methods useful to the analysis of digital technologies’ intersections and impacts on the human experience. Students learn about current topics (such as technological determinism, the digital divide, and participatory culture) and gain a foundational understanding of digital rhetoric, literary analysis, and cultural studies. Students also study key concepts related to digital spaces and artifacts and construct their Digital Cultures e-portfolios. This course must be taken the first quarter of admission.

    Terms Typically Offered: This course is offered every fall and spring quarter
  
  • DICE 3005 - Social Media Planning

    5 credit hours
    Focuses on how social media technologies and practices shape contemporary public relations, advertising, community management, and digital communications through the exploration of social media strategies used by successful organizations. Students will examine how social media, new content and rich media distribution technologies, multi-platform storytelling, and other digital innovations are employed to enhance audience engagement. Examines the ethical and social issues that impact contemporary social media managment. Students will also be introduced to major social media platforms and gain hands-on experience with these tools.

    Terms Typically Offered: fall
  
  • DICE 3010 - Key Concepts in Computing

    5 credit hours
    This course introduces students to key functions and concepts of software applications and computing hardware. Students gain a foundational understanding of application production, basic software design vocabulary, interfaces, and data structures. Students are introduced to the concept of technical bias (implied value systems of computational designs) in relation to software and interfaces.

    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: Offered at least once per year
  
  • DICE 3020 - History of Text Technologies

    5 credit hours
    This course surveys text technologies that have been used to record and transmit cultural knowledge, memory, and imagination through space and time. Students will gain an understanding of how material culture reflects and informs ideology. Students will analyze the rhetoric inherent in artifacts and explore how major technological shifts emerge from and shape a specific cultural moment. Students analyze text technologies such as cave painting, codices, machine-made books, e-books, graphic novels, graffiti, tattoos, and digital media.

    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: Offered at least once per year
  
  • DICE 3030 - Foundations of Digital Rhetoric

    5 credit hours
    This course focuses on the analysis and implementation of rhetorical strategies in internet mediated contexts. Students examine the explicit and implicit rhetoric present in various digital technologies, composing platforms, and born-digital artifacts. Students produce analyses of digital rhetoric and produce creative projects that demonstrate their understanding of digital rhetoric, composition, and the strengths and limitations of specific modes of digital communication.

    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: Offered at least one quarter per year
  
  • DICE 3040 - Ethics in the Digital Age

    5 credit hours
    This course focuses on the intersections of ethics, citizenship, and information in a digital age. Students will deepen their engagement with topics such as technological determinism, privacy, copyright, fair use, plagiarism, open source, creative commons, public domain, orphan works, the digital divide, security, and participatory culture.

    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: this course offered two quarters per year
  
  • DICE 3050 - Digital Cultures: Theory and Practice

    5 credit hours
    In this course, students use interdisciplinary theories and methodologies to analyze digitally mediated spaces, identities, and cultures. Students examine theories from an array of traditions, such as semiotics, rhetoric, phenomenology, pragmatism, critical theory, and cultural studies.

    Co-requisite Course(s): DICE 3000
    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: this course offered two quarters per year
  
  • DICE 3055 - Social Media Implementation

    5 credit hours
    Focuses on the hands-on use of the tools used in the development and management of social media content, both written (blog posts, web content, social media posting) and visual (video, images, audio/podcasts, and data visualization). Use of current popular production tools to create and implement digital content to create an effective social media presence.

    Terms Typically Offered: winter
  
  • DICE 4000 - Everyday Coding

    5 credit hours
    In this course, students continue work on basic concepts in computing, while focusing on programs as cultural artifacts. Students complete useful programming exercises, cultural evaluations of software and publicly available code libraries, and reflections on personal experiences with everyday digital technology. Students reflect upon the software they use on a daily basis and how those applications construct and inform identity and ideology.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DICE 3010
    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: Offered at least one quarter per year
  
  • DICE 4005 - Social Media Analysis and Analytics

    5 credit hours
    Students will develop a practical knowledge of the role analytics plays in social media through the case studies of successful social media campaigns. Students will compile, analyze and present date using current industry tools. Students also explore the ethical issues associated with the interpretation and usage of such analytics and analysis.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DICE 3005, 3055
    Terms Typically Offered: spring
  
  • DICE 4010 - Digital Identities

    5 credit hours
    In this course, students analyze digitally mediated identities. Students appraise and reflect upon not only the digital identities of others, but also the rhetorical and cultural implications of their own digitally constructed identities. Topics of inquiry include online gaming, code-switching, digital sub-cultures, social media, anonymity, and virtual reality.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DICE 3000, 3050
    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: Offered at least one quarter per year
  
  • DICE 4020 - Global Digital Cultures

    5 credit hours
    This course explores the roles of digital technology around the world. Students examine the possibilities and limits of new technologies to reproduce and disrupt culture. Students also explore how specific technologies perpetuate and/or disrupt local and global markets, nationalist identity, and cultural appropriation. Topics include globalization, cultural imperialism, micro-lending, national firewalls, digital witnessing, “right to be forgotten” laws, digital propaganda, and global activism.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DICE 3000, 3050
    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: Offered at least one quarter per year
  
  • DICE 4030 - Multimodal Composition

    5 credit hours
    In this course, students practice inventing, crafting, revising, editing, and producing projects using digital media. Students apply digital rhetoric, theory, and ethics to create multimodal compositions that demonstrate an awareness of purpose, audience, generic conventions, and medium. Students practice skills for producing multimodal digital compositions including visual, textual, audio, and video production.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DICE 3000, 3030
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): DICE 3050
    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: Offered at least one quarter per year
  
  • DICE 4040 - Social Justice and Digital Media

    5 credit hours
    In this course, students explore how various power structures (political, institutional, local, and global) persist in digitally mediated spaces. Students examine the merits of internet media as catalyst for change. Topics include white privilege, the digital divide, intersectionality, identity politics, digital activism, and toxic technocultures. This course has a project-based service-learning component.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DICE 3000, 3050
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): DICE 3030
    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: Offered at least one quarter per year
  
  • DICE 4900 - Senior Synthesis Capstone

    5 credit hours
    This senior capstone course synthesizes the knowledge and skills gained in the course of study. Students revise their e-portfolios for final program review, reflect upon their growth, and articulate future goals for their professional formation and social justice missions.

    Registration Restriction(s): Permission of advisor; Senior Standing; Eligibility for Graduation
    Terms Typically Offered: Variable: Offered two quarters per year

Economics

  
  • ECON 2100 - Business Statistics

    5 credit hours
    Basic statistical procedures, concepts, and computer applications used in the business world. Descriptive statistics, probability, decision theory, probability distributions, sampling distributions, statistical inference, chi-square analysis, and correlation.

    Registration Restriction(s): Sophomore standing
    Prerequisite Course(s): MATH 1130, 1331,
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring
  
  • ECON 2110 - Principles of Economics - Micro

    5 credit hours
    Examines theories and applications of the economic behavior of individual consumers and firms. Explores the allocation of resources through a price system, the role of public policy, and the social impact of economic decisions. Analyzes business production decisions in competitive and imperfect markets.

    Prerequisite Course(s): Completed at least 30 credits
  
  • ECON 2130 - Principles of Economics - Macro

    5 credit hours
    Organization, operation, and control of the American economy in its financial and socio-political settings; problems of inflation, unemployment, taxation, the public debt, money, and banking growth.

    Prerequisite Course(s): completed at least 30 credits
  
  • ECON 2960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ECON 3100 - Quantitative Methods and Applications

    5 credit hours
    A continuation of ECON 2100 with emphasis on the following topics: regression analysis, analysis of variance, data visualization, forecasting and other quantitative methods. Major emphasis will be placed on computer application of the quantitativemethods applicable to business functional areas and on the enhancement of the student’s communication, analytical, and computer skills.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2100
    Terms Typically Offered: fall, winter, spring
  
  • ECON 3110 - Intermediate Microeconomics

    5 credit hours
    The course covers demand, supply, consumer choice, production decisions, and market prices under competitive market conditions. Application to general equilibrium, welfare analysis, and selected topics are also included.

    Prerequisite Course(s): Advanced standing in the Albers School; ECON 2110, MATH 1130 or 1334
  
  • ECON 3130 - Global and Domestic Macroeconomics

    5 credit hours
    Develops the economic theory necessary to understand how the international macroeconomy works and influences the behavior and success of business. Emphasis on the impact of international macroeconomic events and how those events affect a firm’s ability to compete. Serves as intermediate macroeconomics course for economics majors and minors.

    Prerequisite Course(s): Advanced standing in the Albers School; ECON 2130
  
  • ECON 3500 - American Economic History

    5 credit hours
    A study of the key developments in American economic history; application of economic analysis to historical data and events; development of economic institutions.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2130, 2110
  
  • ECON 3610 - Economics of Gender and Family

    5 credit hours
    Examines models of family decision-making and applications, such as marriage, divorce, division of labor and childcare. Analyzes competing explanations for the gender gap in earnings and employment. Considers viewpoints from mainstream economics to feminism.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110
  
  • ECON 3620 - Natural Resource and Environmental Economics

    5 credit hours
    Covers the economic analysis related to natural resource use, including depletable and renewable resources. Environmental topics include pollution, preservation, conservation, and development.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2130 and 2110
  
  • ECON 3630 - Health Economics and Policy

    5 credit hours
    Focuses on the U.S. health care system and how it compares to other international systems. Examines key factors from both the demand and supply side of medical care from the perspective of microeconomic theory. Analyzes the impact of both institutional and public policy changes on patients, providers, and the overall U.S.health care system.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2100, 2110, and Business Calculus
  
  • ECON 3710 - International Political Economy

    5 credit hours
    The course focuses on economics and politics of the international system. The course covers topics/issues relating to trade policy and international gains from trade, exchange rate regimes, international financial institutions, international financial crises, global security, knowledge and intellectual property rights, migration, the illicit global economy and other current issues.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2130
  
  • ECON 3750 - Asian Economic Development

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to Asia and issues in economic development specific to Asia: “Asia as a myth”, conceptualizing Asia; common issues for development in Asia; Asian-style democracy; international relations; autocracy, democracy, and development; policy formulation and reform; institutions and path dependency; NGOs; corruption and governance. Economic issues and problems in Japan, South East Asia, Korea, China, and India. The New World Economy and the rise of China and India. Human rights, outsourcing, gender and globalization, and regional economic co-operation.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110 and 2130
  
  • ECON 3780 - Financial Markets and Economic Development

    5 credit hours
    Nature, function, and regulation of financial markets in the LDCs. Financial repression and liberalization and their effects; financial instability; connections between monetary policy, fiscal policy and inflation; microfinance; exchange rate regimes; central banking in the LDCs; secondary financial markets in the LDCs; the LDC Debt Crisis; The Asian financial crisis; globalization and LDC financial markets; international financial institutions and the LDCs.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2130, 2110
  
  • ECON 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ECON 3960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ECON 4110 - Applied Econometrics

    5 credit hours
    Study of the theory and application of econometrics for students who need to understand and use regression, generalized least squares, and simultaneous equations.

    Prerequisite Course(s): MATH 1130 or 1334; ECON 3100
  
  • ECON 4120 - Forecasting Business Conditions

    5 credit hours
    This course emphasizes critical analysis of time series data and forecasting reports to understand the value and the shortcomings of forecasting practice. Topics covered include: single and multiple linear regressions, ARMA models, evaluation of forecasts, unit roots and vector autoregression (VAR).

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2130, 2110 and 3100
  
  • ECON 4650 - Law and Economics

    5 credit hours
    Applies economic analysis to the American legal system and particularly to the common law. the analysis considers the economic effects of legal rules, whether and how legal rules should be shaped to reflect economic concerns, and the extent to which the law has evolved towards economically efficient outcomes. The course encourages systematic thinking about moral issues and questions of justice.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110, ECON 3110 recommended
  
  • ECON 4660 - Public Finance

    5 credit hours
    Examines justifications for the public sector. Discusses tax and spending activities from the perspective of microeconomic theory. Analyzes the influence of tax and spending programs on household behavior, resource allocation, and the distribution of income. Considers tradeoffs faced by policymakers and the design of public policies. Surveys institutional details of existing federal and state government policies and considers reforms to these policies.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110 and 2130, and ECON 3100
  
  • ECON 4680 - Urban/Regional Economics

    5 credit hours
    The causes and consequences of the interdependencies of firms, individuals, households, and governmental units within the constrained space of urban areas. Problems of land, housing, transportation, labor, and public services.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110 and 2130, AND
  
  • ECON 4690 - Market Power and Response

    5 credit hours
    Discusses market definition, measurements and determinants of market structure, and the relationship between market structure and market power. Discusses how a single firm can gain and exploit market power. Analyzes rivals’ strategic reactions to market power using game theoretic concepts and tools. Studies roles of information and commitment in reacting to competitive threats or in exploiting competitive opportunities. Considers government response to private market power through economic analysis of antitrust and competition policies.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110 and 2130, ECON 3110 recommended
  
  • ECON 4720 - International Economics

    5 credit hours
    Pattern, organization, and promotion of U.S. and world trade. Trade theories and policies. Exchange rates, balance of payments and the operation of international monetary systems. WTO. European Integration. Multinationals in foreign trade.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110, 2130, and 3100. ECON 3130 recommended
  
  • ECON 4760 - Microeconomics of Development

    5 credit hours
    People in developing countries face a large number of issues that affect their well-being negatively. Most have low income that vary substantially over time, significant health risk, and markets that are either missing or do not work as efficiently as in developed countries. The purpose of this class is to examine how much people respond when faced with markets that are non-perfect and especially what policies can be introduced to improve people’s lives. focus will be on the microeconomic aspects of devlopment, especially on how households behave, and we will show how to extend and adapt the standard economics tools to analyze real-world situations.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110, 3100
  
  • ECON 4770 - Policy Analysis in International Development

    5 credit hours
    Applied policy analysis for international development: Field research methods, internet data sources, statistical analysis, SWOT analysis, cost-benefit analysis, sector-wide approaches, project management, monitoring and evaluation. Applications include health care policy, environmental policy, education policy, and poverty reduction strategies.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2130, 2110, 3100
  
  • ECON 4790 - Economic Growth

    5 credit hours
    Sources and causes of long run economic growth; factors which have kept some countries from growing. Cross national data on income levels and other measures of economic well-being. Economic models used to explain the growth process. Theoretical and empirical models are used to analyze the impact of government polices on economic growth.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110, ECON 2130, ECON 3100. ECON 3130 recommended.
  
  • ECON 4800 - History of Economic Thought

    5 credit hours
    Major historical developments in economic thought, ancient to contemporary, Christian influence, mercantilism, laissez faire; German and Austrian schools, Marx and socialists; Keynes and neo-Keynesian analysis. Can serve as senior synthesis for economics majors.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECON 2110 and 2130, ECON 3110 recommended
  
  • ECON 4890 - Senior Research

    5 credit hours
    An advanced course providing the opportunity for students to pursue topics in breadth and depth, and to apply the tools of economic analysis to current issues in national and international economic policy. Prerequisite: permission of department chair and a three-faculty member committee. Limited to economics majors fulfilling the Senior Synthesis requirement. Does not satisfy economics elective for business economics major or economics minor.

  
  • ECON 4910 - Special Topics

    2 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ECON 4940 - International Study Tour: Economics

    5 credit hours
    The study of economic and business environment of a foreign country. Course will include travel to the country to observe activities and conditions and to meet with representatives of businesses and other institutions. Location of tour can vary. Check with the department for details.

  
  • ECON 4950 - Internship

    0 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ECON 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours

Education

  
  • EDUC 3000 - Schooling in American Society

    3 credit hours
    A course for undergraduates who are considering teaching as a profession, as well as other undergraduates who are interested in learning about schooling in America. Issues explored include a look at the original purposes of schools in this country, the current state of American education, the issues facing schools today, and a consideration of the schools of the future. The role of the teacher in each of these settings is examined. Visits to three schools are required as part of this course.

  
  • EDUC 3800 - Preparation for Leadership

    2 credit hours
    Designed for undergraduate students who wish to develop and sharpen their understanding of leadership and leadership skills.

  
  • EDUC 4120 - Math for K-8 Teachers

    3 credit hours
    A participation-oriented, hands-on review of the mathematical content needed to teach elementary school mathematics in a manner consistent with national reform standards in mathematics education. The focus is on the acquisition of conceptual understanding in preparation for teaching.

  
  • EDUC 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • EDUC 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • EDUC 4990 - Directed Research

    1 to 5 credit hours

Education and Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies

  
  • EDLS 2400 - The Arts, Health, and Fitness in Learning

    2 credit hours
    This is a participation-oriented, hands-on application of the principles of designing effective instructional activities in the areas of arts, health and fitness needed to teach elementary / middle school. The focus is on the acquisition of conceptual understanding in preparation for teaching and an introduction to planning and implementing learning activities in the areas of arts, health and fitness for diverse learners. The course will focus on the ability to create and implement interdisciplinary lessons and activities that integrate humanities, fitness and the arts to enhance student learning. This course includes field time in a local school.

    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 3100 - Principles of Effective Teaching in Diverse Schools

    5 credit hours
    This course will provide a foundation of essential strategies and principles for effective instruction, assessment, classroom management and differentiating supports for diverse learners. Laws, practices and procedures for identifying and supporting learners with special needs will also be introduced. This course is directly linked to field experience in a local school. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): IDLS 2020
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 3400 - Literacy Instruction and Assessment in Schools

    5 credit hours
    An overview of basic knowledge in literacy instruction and assessment. Students will learn about the five domains of literacy: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension and fluency and how they interact. Students will also learn about L1 and L2 language acquisition and its influence on literacy.

    Prerequisite Course(s): EDLS 3100
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 3600 - Social Studies Instruction and Assessment In Schools

    3 credit hours
    This course will focus on social studies methods that are embedded in community interaction such as simulations, service learning or project based learning.

    Prerequisite Course(s): EDLS 3100
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 3800 - Mathematics/Science Instruction and Assessment in Schools I

    5 credit hours
    This is a participation-oriented, hands-on exploration and application of the mathematical and science content needed to teach elementary / middle school students in a manner consistent with national reform standards in mathematics and science education. This course aligns the new standards in math and science with effective instructional strategies to bring these skills and concepts to life for 21st century learners. Emphasis is placed on the use of instructional practices that prompt integrative teaching and inquiry based learning, which includes problem solving, reasoning, communication, connection, and representation. Students will begin planning and implementing lessons in the context of their field placement classrooms.

    Prerequisite Course(s): EDLS 3100
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 3820 - Mathematics/Science Instruction and Assessment in Schools II

    5 credit hours
    This is the second part of a hands-on exploration and application of the mathematical and science content needed to teach elementary / middle school students in a manner consistent with national reform standards in mathematics and science education. Emphasis in this course is placed on the use of instructional practices that prompt integrative teaching and inquiry based learning, with an emphasis on unit plan development using the universal design of learning framework (UDL). Students will be planning and implementing lessons in the context of their field placement classrooms.

    Prerequisite Course(s): EDLS 3800
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 4000 - Start of School Year Field Experience

    2 credit hours
    This course will provide teacher candidates with an opportunity to immerse themselves in a clinical field setting at the start of the K-12 school year to experience the process of planning and preparing for the school year with a cooperating teacher, beginning the school year with students and families, and building relationships in the school and community. Students will spend minimum of three days a week in the classroom throughout the scheduled time. This experience will lay the foundation for field experiences in fall quarter classes and the winter clinical internship.

    Prerequisite Course(s): EDLS 3100
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 4200 - Impact of Trauma on Learners

    2 credit hours
    This course will provide an overview of the impact of chronic stress and trauma on students and their families found in today’s diverse classroom, as well as systems and strategies to support the academic and social success of these learners. State laws and school procedures related to being a mandated reporter will also be explored. Course content and experiences will be linked to a field experience in a local school.

    Prerequisite Course(s): EDLS 3100
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 4700 - Clinical Internship

    13 credit hours
    The clinical internship will immerse the teacher candidate in the profession of teaching at a full time level for 450 hours. Teacher candidates will implement knowledge, skills and strategies learned through previous EDLS coursework and related field experiences in the context of a full time, co-teaching internship. This course is taken in conjunction with EDLS 4710, Clinical Internship Seminar lead by the University Supervisor. Successful completion of all EDLS course work (except EDLS 4800) is required prior to enrolling in this course.

    Prerequisite Course(s): All required EDLS courses except EDLS 4800
    Co-requisite Course(s): EDLS 4710
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 4710 - Clinical Internship Seminar

    2 credit hours
    This course engages students in a seminar process to share, analyze and extend students’ professional experiences, including collaboration with other professionals, parents and communities. Teacher candidates reflect upon their clinical internship teaching experiences in terms of evaluation of professional growth and future goals, acquisition of new knowledge and how it relates the teaching profession, as well as how successful they are in linking previously learned theory and methodology with their classroom experiences. Taken concurrently with EDLS 4700.

    Prerequisite Course(s): All required EDLS courses except EDLS 4800
    Co-requisite Course(s): EDLS 4700
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 4800 - Issues and Advocacy in Education

    3 credit hours
    This course engages students in reflecting on their student teaching internship experience in a structured way and in making sense of this experience. Students explore political, ethical, and social issues in education, the purpose of schooling and practical principles for effective teaching, and teachers as leaders for change.

    Prerequisite Course(s): EDLS 4700
    Terms Typically Offered: Courses will be offered beginning 2018 and 2019
  
  • EDLS 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours

Electrical and Computer Engineering

  
  • ECEGR 1200 - Digital Operations and Computation

    4 credit hours
    Number systems; Boolean algebra; combinational and sequential circuits; arithmetic operations; registers, counters, and memory; circuit simulation; building and testing digital circuits; programmable devices. Open to all university students.

    Terms Typically Offered: FQ
  
  • ECEGR 2000 - Physical Computing with Python

    4 credit hours
    There are two major concepts behind the design of this course. The first concept will focus on learning introductory problem-solving and programming using Python.  Students will learn to develop algorithms in readable and well-documented code to solve problems.  Python is a simple and approachable vehicle for learning these skills.  The second concept will focus on physical computing using Python running on Raspberry Pi hardware.  Students will learn to use Python to interface to the input and output capabilities of the hardware.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C- or better in MATH 1021 or equivalent
    Terms Typically Offered: fall
  
  • ECEGR 2010 - Computer Tools

    1 credit hour
    An introduction to various Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools used in electrical and computer engineering.

    Co-requisite Course(s): ECEGR 2100
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ, SQ
  
  • ECEGR 2020 - C++ Programming

    5 credit hours
    Programming and problem solving using the C++  programming language. Classes, dynamic memory, linked lists, stacks, queues. Integrated development environments.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 2000
    Terms Typically Offered: winter
  
  • ECEGR 2100 - Electrical Circuits I

    5 credit hours
    Fundamental concepts and units, Kirchhoff’s laws, mesh and node analysis, equivalent circuits, linearity and superposition; first and second order circuits; natural and forced responses, initial conditions; sinusoidal analysis.

    Prerequisite Course(s): PHYS 1220
    Co-requisite Course(s): MATH 2320
    Terms Typically Offered: SQ
  
  • ECEGR 2210 - Programmable Devices

    2 credit hours
    Designing a number of digital functions with programmable devices, e.g. communications protocols, state machines, peripherals; VHDL; debug tools and techniques; introduction to systems oreintation.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 1200
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ
  
  • ECEGR 2220 - Microprocessor Design

    4 credit hours
    Design of digital components and subsystems of a typical microprocessor. Assembly language programming, memory access, Instruction processing, peripherals. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 2210 and ECEGR 2020
    Terms Typically Offered: SQ
  
  • ECEGR 2960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ, WQ, SQ, RQ
  
  • ECEGR 3000 - Introduction to MATLAB

    1 credit hour
    Laboratory oriented course designed to introduce students who already have taken a programming course to programming in MATLAB. Topics include introduction to the MATLAB environment, matrix manipulation and computation, MATLAB programming language, writing functions and scripts, and production of 2D graphical output.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 2000 or CPSC 1220
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ, WQ
  
  • ECEGR 3110 - Electrical Circuits II

    4 credit hours
    Phasors and impedance; Laplace transforms; system functions and the s-plane; frequency response description, Bode diagrams; AC power; two-port analysis; introduction to the digital computer in circuit analysis and design.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 2100
    Co-requisite Course(s): MATH 2340
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ
  
  • ECEGR 3111 - Laboratory I: Circuits

    2 credit hours
    A series of laboratory experiences to develop skills in the use of test and measurement equipment as well as circuit simulation, building, debugging and testing. Some of the circuits are part of a large project that gradually gets completed in the three quarter junior lab sequence.

    Co-requisite Course(s): ECEGR 3110
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ
  
  • ECEGR 3120 - Semiconductor Devices and Circuits

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to semiconductors. Diode and field-effect transistor characteristics. Analysis and design of elementary electronic circuits using diodes and FETs. Biasing and small signal models of transistor amplifiers. CMOS digital logic circuits. Introduction to the Bipolar Junction Transistor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3110
    Co-requisite Course(s): ECEGR 3121
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ
  
  • ECEGR 3121 - Laboratory II: Electronics

    2 credit hours
    A series of laboratory experiences to incorporate electronics into various sections of the year-long design project. The emphasis is to strengthen skills in the use of test and measurement equipment and in the simulation, building, and debugging of a variety of electronic circuits. Some programming will be used according to the project needs.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 2010 and ECEGR 3111
    Co-requisite Course(s): ECEGR 3120
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ
  
  • ECEGR 3130 - Elements of Electrical Engineering

    5 credit hours
    An introduction to major areas of electrical engineering. Topics are selected from basic circuit theory; linear systems; electronics; digital logic; electromagnetics; and energy conversion and power. Intended for engineering and natural science students not majoring in electrical engineering;

    Prerequisite Course(s): MATH 2340 and PHYS 1220
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ
  
  • ECEGR 3210 - Embedded Systems

    5 credit hours
    System architectures; data acquisition tradeoffs; introduction to digital controls; Software architectures for real time operating systems; design of device drivers and board support packages; software engineering; capstone project involving a prototype embedded system.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 2220
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ
  
  • ECEGR 3300 - Fields and Waves

    4 credit hours
    Transmission lines are studied as a bridge from circuit analysis to understanding electromagnetic fields. Then, electric and magnetic fields are studied using vector algebra, culminating in Maxwell’s equations which are used in the analysis of plane waves and the introductory study of guided waves, electromagnetic (EM) interference, and antennas.

    Prerequisite Course(s): PHYS 1230; MATH 2340; ECEGR 3000; ECEGR 3110
    Terms Typically Offered: SQ
  
  • ECEGR 3500 - Electrical Energy Systems

    4 credit hours
    An introduction to electric energy systems. Topics include an overview of electric power systems and power factor; three phase circuits; magnetic circuits; transformers and an introduction to electro-mechanical energy conversion.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3110
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ
  
  • ECEGR 3710 - Signals and Systems

    4 credit hours
    Linear systems and response type classifications. Time-domain and frequency-domain signal representations. System functions. Impulse response. Convolution. Fourier series and transforms. Signal spectra.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3000; ECEGR 3110; MATH 2340
    Terms Typically Offered: SQ
  
  • ECEGR 3711 - Laboratory III: Signals and Systems

    2 credit hours
    A series of laboratory experiences, many of which draw on signals and systems concepts. The experiments directly related to the year-long design project will aid in its successful completion.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3121
    Co-requisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710
    Terms Typically Offered: SQ
  
  • ECEGR 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ, WQ, SQ
  
  • ECEGR 3960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ, WQ, SQ, RQ
  
  • ECEGR 4110 - Analog Electronic Circuits

    4 credit hours
    Differential and multistage transistor amplifiers. Classes of amplifiers. Frequency response of transistor circuits. Introduction to feedback. Internal circuitry of the operational amplifier. Operational amplifier circuits.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3120
  
  • ECEGR 4111 - Advanced Electronics Laboratory

    2 credit hours
    A special topics electronics laboratory focusing on practical applications in electrical and computer engineering. Design projects vary depending on the interests of the students and instructor. The iterative process of design, simulation, fabrication, and testing is emphasized. A one-hour lecture and one four-hour laboratory session per week. May be retaken for credit with permission of the department chair.

    Registration Restriction(s): Permission of instructor
  
  • ECEGR 4120 - Special Topics in Electronics

    4 credit hours
    A continuation of ECEGR 4110 Analog Electronic Circuits covering topics selected from, but not limited to, feedback and stability, active filters, oscillators, data converters, signal generators, and digital electronics.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 4110
  
  • ECEGR 4130 - Analog CMOS Integrated Circuits

    4 credit hours
    Analog CMOS circuits including current sources, voltage references, and basic amplifier stages used in integrated circuits, the internal circuitry of operational amplifiers, and analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters. Feedback. Fundamentals of integrated circuit layout and fabrication.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3120
  
  • ECEGR 4140 - Introduction to VLSI Circuit Design

    4 credit hours
    An introduction to the design of very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuits using silicon CMOS process technology and CAD software. Aspects of manufacturing, design, and testing are covered in lecture. The laboratory introduces students to professional-level software and culminates in a major circuit design.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 1200 and ECEGR 3120
 

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