May 20, 2024  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

English

Courses that fulfill requirements for the English major are designated by the following codes:

CW - Multi-Genre Creative Writing
CWD - Creative Writing Drama/Film
CWF - Creative Writing Fiction
CWN - Creative Writing Non-Fiction
CWP - Creative Writing Poetry
INT - Intercultural/Intersectional
Pre-1800 - Pre-1800 Literature
1800-Pres - 1800-Present Literature
 

 



 

  
  • ENGL 3730 - African Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of postcolonial Anglophone African literature and some francophone writing in translation. Possible topics include the impact of imperialism, cultural and political decolonization, and the place of Africa in a global economy through a study of different literary works. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
  
  • ENGL 3810 - Children’s Literature

    5 credit hours
    The study of traditional and contemporary folk and fairy tales, as well as other modes of narrative for young readers. The course includes interpretive and creative writing assignments.

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 3820 - Introduction to Film Analysis

    5 credit hours
    This foundational course in film studies is a requirement for all majors and minors and is intended as a prerequisite for all subsequent film classes. It introduces you to fundamental areas of film form: the frame, narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, performance and sound, offering you a vocabulary for the formal analysis of film aesthetics. We study the operations of each of these formal parts in detail and then consider how they work together. This course is an introduction to the specific critical methods necessary to describe, analyze, and appreciate the film text.

    Terms Typically Offered: Twice per year
  
  • ENGL 3830 - Detective Fiction

    5 credit hours
    A study of the genre of detective fiction from its beginnings (Poe, Conan-Doyle) through its golden age in Britain (Christie, Allingham) and America (Hammett, Chandler). The class also considers more contemporary iterations of the genre (Paretsky, James, Mosley, and others). The primary literature is read alongside theoretical investigations of the genre’s possibilities and limitations. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 3840 - Ecocriticism

    5 credit hours
    A thorough study of ecocriticism, a type of literary criticism that focuses on the relationship between nature and literature. This course offers the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of ecology as well as a chance to evaluate the impact of human developments on the natural world. It focuses on the development of a critical framework for an in-depth analysis of the modern environmental movement and explores how writing can be employed to address environmental problems plaguing the world today. It also requires students to learn and utilize a variety of written genres in order to engage in debates related to ecocriticism and environmental justice both locally and globally. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Every quarter
  
  • ENGL 3960 - Directed Study

    2 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4110 - Advanced Non-Fiction Writing

    5 credit hours
    Advanced study of non-fiction genres including travel writing, documentaries, and social commentary. CWN

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4130 - Advanced Fiction Writing

    5 credit hours
    Intensive study and practice of the craft of fiction writing., with emphasis on revision. Includes a craft-focused study of literary models. CWF

    Prerequisite Course(s): ENGL 3130
    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4150 - Advanced Poetry Writing

    5 credit hours
    Emphasis on craft, word usage, revision, and study of literary models of poetry, with students presenting their own work for group response. CWP

    Prerequisite Course(s): ENGL 3160
    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4210 - Medieval Masculinities

    5 credit hours
    This course uses contemporary literary theory to investigate the category of the masculine in the Middle Ages. The class engages both chivalric and courtly love texts, as well as texts that understand the masculine as a category in need of more severe demarcation (such as The Letters of Abelard and Heloise). Because masculinity cannot be understood without its relation to notions of the feminine, the class also engages those texts that read the categories as inter-dependent. Pre-1800; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4220 - Medieval Women and Writing

    5 credit hours
    A study of writings by medieval women, which may Marie de France’s Lais, Heloise’s correspondence with Abelard, The Book of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich’s Showings, or Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies. Literary, political, and religious texts will be analyzed from a theoretical perspective, focusing on feminist theories. Feminist readings may include works by He Cixous, Julia Kristeva, Theresa de Lauretis, or Eve Sedgwick. Pre-1800; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4230 - Medieval Sexualities

    5 credit hours
    A study of medieval texts, primarily literary, but also historical, religious, or philosophical, through the lens of queer theory and from an intersectional perspective. Primary sources may include chivalric romances, epic stories, or lyrical poems from Christian, Muslim, or Jewish perspectives. Queer theory will illuminate and interrogate medieval understandings of sex, sexuality, and gender; conversely, medieval texts will illuminate and interrogate contemporary theories about gender and sexuality.  INT; Pre-1800.

  
  • ENGL 4310 - Donne and His Critics

    5 credit hours
    An examination of John Donne’s poetry and prose and the development of Donne criticism during the last 100 years. Students will acquire enough exposure to Donne and his critics to learn the practices of modern literary scholarship and write their own criticism of Donne’s texts. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4320 - Milton Seminar

    5 credit hours
    Milton’s poetry and prose that situates these works within the literary, cultural, and critical contexts informing them. The course investigates the major interpretive cruxes within Milton’s texts and the ways in which scholars have addressed these difficulties. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4410 - Female Gothic

    5 credit hours
    A study of the history and development of the Female Gothic genre, from the 18th century to the present, focusing on the depiction of women as well as of the men in Gothic narratives who inevitably either marry these women or try to kill them, or possibly both. Film, art and music will supplement the discussion of literary texts. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
  
  • ENGL 4420 - Modernism/Postmodernism

    5 credit hours
    A study of 20th century novels concerned with issues that both unify and divide the early part of the century and the later, such as the problem of subjectivity, life in the metropolis, and the movement of history. This course may examine works of Woolf, Dos Passos, Faulkner, Nabokov, Pynchon, and DeLillo. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
  
  • ENGL 4430 - Time Travels

    5 credit hours
    A course that uses interdisciplinary work on modernity and postmodernity ” from such fields as philosophy, cultural history, new media studies, and critical geography” in order to study the history and importance of the theme of time in twentieth-century literature and culture. The first half of the course is devoted to modernism’s obsession with time. The second half focuses on the rise of time-travel narratives and alternate-history fantasies. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
  
  • ENGL 4510 - Indigenous American Literature

    5 credit hours
    An examination of select Indigenous literatures of North America with an emphasis on advanced historical and tribally specific analysis. The course will provide an overview of Indigenous literature ranging from Pre-Columbian times to the present, but with special attention given to the diversity of Indigenous expression. INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Every WQ
  
  • ENGL 4520 - African American Slave Narratives

    5 credit hours
    A study of the three forms of slave narratives: 18th century (Equiano), 19th century fugitive narratives (Douglass, Jacobs), and the 20th century WPA narratives, and how each type of narrative reflects the political stance toward slavery in the nation and the world. INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4530 - Slavery and Labor in American Film and Literature

    5 credit hours
    An interdisciplinary study of the politics of work in America, both forced and free, and the literary and film treatments of these issues. Slave narratives, slave owner narratives, and labor texts, such as Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle will be considered, along with films such as Amistad, Matewan, and Wall Street. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4540 - Asian American Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of several American writers of Asian descent. The course will explore the dominant themes of Asian American literature, the politics of identity, and the tension between the literary issues and social justice. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4550 - Americans in Paris

    5 credit hours
    An interdisciplinary study-abroad course that traces the rise of Modernism in its socio-historical-scientific and cultural contexts, from its roots in impressionist and post-impressionist art to its flowering in the literary and artistic life of Paris in the period just before and after WWI. Phase I begins on campus spring quarter and focuses on Hemingway, Stein, Lawrence, Picasso, and other expatriates. Phase II unfolds in late summer in Paris, and may include excursions to Giverny and the south of France. Enrollment limited. 1800-Pres

    Registration Restriction(s): instructor permission
    Terms Typically Offered: Every SQ
  
  • ENGL 4610 - Early American Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of the literature of the first settlers in the New World up to the American Revolution, focusing on writers in English and highlighting the major controversies that erupted during this period. Topics may include European attitudes towards and fantasies about the New World, how the settlers imagined masculinity and femininity, and the representation of indigenous and enslaved peoples. Authors may include John Winthrop, Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Roger Williams, Cotton Mather, Mary Rowlandson, Jonathan Edwards, Mercy Otis Warren, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Abigail and John Adams, and Judith Sargent Murray. Pre-1800; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4620 - Contemporary American Fiction

    5 credit hours
    A study of innovative American fiction that introduces the reader to new and diverse narrative forms. Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon, Maxine Hong Kingston, Leslie Silko, Norman Mailer, Don DeLillo, and Ralph Ellison are authors likely to be included in this course. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4710 - Japanese Drama

    5 credit hours
    A study of the development of the major Japanese theatrical forms, together with a comparative examination of Greek and Elizabethan tragedy. INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4720 - Writing Resistance: Women in Non-Western Cultures

    5 credit hours
    Writing Resistance examines different genres of writing by women from South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The course focuses on how women use writing to challenge oppressive social structures. Course emphasizes postcolonial feminist theories. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
  
  • ENGL 4730 - Postcolonial Literature and Theory

    5 credit hours
    A study the development of colonial discourse theory and postcolonial literary theory in the writings of Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, Homi Bhabha, Robert Young and others. These theories will be applied to selected literary works, such as Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, Achebe’s Anthills of the Savannah, and Nadine Gordimer’s Burgher’s Daughter. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
  
  • ENGL 4810 - The History of Narrative from Homer to Hypertext

    5 credit hours
    A study of the history of storytelling and narrative from primary oral cultures (using Homer), through the high literate period (using novels and poetry), to the electronic present (using hypertext and computer mediated arts).

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
  • ENGL 4840 - Literary Theory

    5 credit hours
    An examination of the texts of historical and contemporary critical theory and their influence on the writing and reading of literature. Other issues, such as the nature of art, beauty, and literature or the relationship between a society and its literature may also be discussed. Recommended especially for students preparing for advanced study.

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
  
  • ENGL 4850 - Major Author Seminar

    5 credit hours
    Course normally focuses on one author writing after 1800.

    Terms Typically Offered: One time per year
  
  • ENGL 4890 - Departmental Honors Directed Reading

    5 credit hours
    Directed reading for students in the English department honors major.

    Prerequisite Course(s): Approval of honors project coordinator
    Terms Typically Offered: Every WQ
  
  • ENGL 4895 - Departmental Honors Thesis Supervision

    5 credit hours
    Thesis supervision for students in the English department honors major.

    Prerequisite Course(s): Approval of honors project coordinator
    Terms Typically Offered: Every SQ
  
  • ENGL 4900 - Senior Synthesis Capstone

    5 credit hours

    This course is the culmination of the major and provides students with the following opportunities: to reflect on the value of their major and discern its relationship to liberal education; to think imaginatively and creatively about questions of writing and interpretation; to extend the academic skills demonstrated in 4000-level research papers; and to write in other modes and genres. The course asks students to reflect on the meaning of their education through the discipline of English and to prepare for the transition from college to their future. It will include a graded reflective writing assignment as described by Module IV of the Core Curriculum.

    Registration Restriction(s): senior standing
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ and SQ

  
  • ENGL 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Every quarter
  
  • ENGL 4950 - Internship

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Supervised service in which students apply and develop their skills as English majors working for a business or non-profit institution or agency. Graded CR/F.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior or senior standing, English majors only, and permission of the director of interns.
    Prerequisite Course(s): 20 credits of upper-level English
    Terms Typically Offered: Every quarter
  
  • ENGL 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Every quarter
  
  • ENGL 4990 - Directed Research

    1 to 5 credit hours

English Language and Culture Bridge

  
  • ELCB 0800 - Academic Vocabulary and Grammar

    5 credit hours
    (Required of students with TOEFL scores ranging from 190/520/68 to 210/547/78, inclusive) The class concentrates on essential academic vocabulary and grammar features fundamental in formal academic reading and writing in English. The course specifically focuses on essential academic lexis and syntax in English academic prose that can enhance reading fluency and comprehension, as well as writing clarity and cohesion.

  
  • ELCB 0860 - English Grammar

    3 credit hours
    The class concentrates on syntactic structures, such as sentence constructions and phrase-level grammar, essential in the production of English academic writing. The course is specifically geared toward lexical and grammatical regularities in English syntax that can facilitate writing clarity and cohesion.

  
  • ELCB 0870 - Academic Reading and Writing

    5 credit hours
    The class focuses on the interaction between reading, writing, and critical thinking. Paraphrasing, library research, and the writing process as it pertains to American academic writing, as well as effective reading skills are examined. Issues of sentence structure and style are also addressed.

  
  • ELCB 0880 - Academic Oral Skills

    2 credit hours
    The class concentrates on the interaction of culture and language in the classroom. Informal and formal speech varieties, lecture comprehension, classroom participation, intelligibility, and oral presentations are examined.

  
  • ELCB 0900 - Advanced Academic Writing

    3 to 5 credit hours
    The class presents various concepts fundamental to academic writing in English (reasoned and objective argumentation, information synthesis, writing from sources, and the essential elements of essay structure). Paraphrasing and vocabulary development are additional ongoing course goals. The class also focuses on American cultural assumptions and values as they impact cross-cultural interaction.

  
  • ELCB 0910 - Advanced Academic Oral Skills

    3 credit hours
    The class focuses on appropriate discourse registers, speaking and listening skills, and presentation formation, as well as discussion and other classroom participation skills. Academic and professional vocabulary development is an additional ongoing course goal.

  
  • ELCB 0920 - Supplemental ELCB

    0 credit hours
    The supplemental class is for business majors and graduate students in the Albers School of Business. This student-centered workshop includes lecture and discussion in support of an academic course (MGMT 280). Mandatory CR/F grading with minimum achievement level equal to a C grade.

  
  • ELCB 0960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ELCB 0990 - Advanced Academic Writing for International Graduate Students

    5 credit hours
    The primary focus of this course is on improving written academic discourse. Specific problems of grammar and mechanics will be addressed on an as-needed basis. Writing assignments include taking notes, paraphrasing, documenting sources, writing abstracts, summaries, critiques, article reviews, and a short research paper. Students will also make oral presentations.

    Registration Restriction(s): Restricted to non-native English speaking graduate students.

Environmental Science

  
  • ENSC 1000 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    1 credit hour
    This course will provide students an overview of the field of environmental science. It includes invited speakers who discuss their professional experiences, field trips to project sites, and faculty lectures.

    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • ENSC 1500 - Environmental Field Methods

    5 credit hours
    Learn basic field methods used in environmental science, data collection, documentation and sampling techniques. Practice data collection in forest, coastal, riparian, and alpine environments. Specific skills include navigation, mapping, snow studies, tree coring, rock, soil, water, and sediment sampling, hydrologic and hydraulic measurements, and stratigraphic analysis. Instruction and practice in designing a field-based research project. Registration restrictions may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Registration Restriction(s): Environmental science majors only
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ENSC 1910 - Special Topic

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ENSC 2400 - Environmental Sensors

    2 credit hours
    Explores the use of electronic sensors to automatically measure and log environmental variables such as temperature, light, pressure, and precipitation. Focuses on basic sensing approaches, calibration, and communication between sensors and dataloggers.Also explores remote sensor installations by addressing power management/battery life, weatherproofing, and approaches to wireless communication. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): CPSC 1220 or MEGR 2810 or ECEGR 1000
  
  • ENSC 2910 - Special Topic

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ENSC 3250 - Environmental Geology

    4 credit hours
    An introduction to principles of geological processes and paradigms in geology relevant to environmental issues. Assessment of how geological processes are related to the use and abuse of natural and economic resources. Field and computer methods will be used to gather, analyze and synthesize data.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CHEM 1500
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall odd years
  
  • ENSC 3300 - Natural Systems

    4 credit hours
    The goal of this course is to develop a scientific understanding of the entire Earth system by describing how its major physical and biological systems function, interact and evolve. The course explores the integrated Earth system which includes the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. Topics include global energy balance, circulation and dynamics of atmosphere and oceans, climate, biogeochemical cycles, plate tectonics, ecology and biodiversity, geomorphology, limnology, and groundwater dynamics.

    Prerequisite Course(s): MATH 1230 or MATH 1334; CHEM 1500
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall even years
  
  • ENSC 3410 - Applied Environmental Biology

    4 credit hours
    Basic principles of microbiology and biochemistry as applied to environmental control and wastewater treatment. Kinetic and energetic aspects are emphasized. Effects of domestic and industrial water pollution on the biological characteristics of natural waters and aquatic life are studied. Laboratory includes plating techniques, studying biological growth kinetics and advanced genetic techniques such as gene amplification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cross-listed with CEEGR 3410 (formerly CEEGR 341).

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • ENSC 3420 - Environmental Engineering Chemistry

    4 credit hours
    Principles of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics applied to fundamental understanding of aqueous environmental samples, including natural waters, wastewaters, and treated waters; factors controlling inorganic and organic chemical concentrations, acid-base equilibria, and absorption phenomena. Cross-listed with CEEGR 3420 (formerly CEEGR 342).

    Prerequisite Course(s): CHEM 1500/1501 or equivalent
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ENSC 3500 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    5 credit hours
    GIS is a vibrant and pervasive technology for investigating and understanding societal, environmental and ecological problems (and more) from a spatial perspective. This course introduces students to GIS concepts, such as posing spatial questions, finding and using GIS data, cartographic literacy and multi-step spatial problem solving. Students will learn how to acquire, map and analyze spatial data (in raster and vector forms) in order to assess a variety of questions, and will learn to communicate results in spatially empowered decision making. Cross-listed with EVST 3500.

  
  • ENSC 3700 - Intermediate GIS

    3 to 5 credit hours
    Course builds on basic GIS principles and skills to develop further expertise in GIS analysis and perform professional-level GIS work. Students will learn to perform basic statistical and multi-step analysis of GIS data, apply topology rules, execute vector and raster analysis tasks, credit, edit and assess quality of GIS data, customize and augment ArcGIS, and make professional quality maps to answer a socio-environmental question and communicate results.Emphasis is placed on real-world GIS assignments and applications in various subject areas. Students completing the 5-credit option are expected to complete an independent research project. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ENSC 3500 or EVST 3500
  
  • ENSC 3710 - Water Resources I

    4 credit hours
    Hydrologic data sources, collection, and analysis, including frequency analysis. Precipitation, runoff, evaporation, and transpiration. Analysis of stream flow, hydrographs, flood mitigation, and drainage basins. Cross-listed with CEEGR 3710.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior Standing
    Prerequisite Course(s): ENSC 1500
    Co-requisite Course(s): MATH 1210
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ENSC 3760 - Environmental Law and Impact Studies

    3 credit hours
    Social, economic, and engineering factors involved in environmental regulations. National and regional water policies, programs, and administration. Emphasis on national environmental policy act and its implementation. Terminology of environmental inventory, assessment, and impact statement. Cross-listed with CEEGR 3760 (formerly CEEGR 376).

    Registration Restriction(s): Senior standing recommended
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter even years
  
  • ENSC 3860 - Green Engineering

    3 credit hours
    Introduces principles of green building including the sustainable use of water, energy and materials. Focuses also on the design of alternative energy production systems including solar, wind and microhydro systems for the developing world. Sustainable pollution control technologies for air and water are also examined. Students are required to identify a project that culminates with a final design report and presentation. Cross-listed with CEEGR 3860.

    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): ENSC 3420
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter odd years
  
  • ENSC 3910 - Special Topic

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ENSC 4730 - Principles of Environmental Engineering

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to water and wastewater treatment processes, air pollution control and hazardous waste management through the understanding of physical, chemical, and biological processes as well as mass balance analyses. Four lec-tures and one laboratory or field trip per week. Cross-listed with CEEGR 4730 (formerly CEEGR 473).

    Prerequisite Course(s): CHEM 1500/1501, ENSC 3420
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • ENSC 4870 - Senior Capstone I: Proposal and Preliminary Research

    3 credit hours
    The senior synthesis sequence is a year-long practical research project. In this sequence students will work on 3-4 person teams with a professional sponsor on a real-world project. This will provide more practical experience for students, introduce them to best practices in their profession, and improve their communication skills through report writing and oral presentations. Specifically, ENSC 4870 during fall quarter will focus on doing preliminary research on their project, identifying project tasks, and reporting their project goals and plan of implementation through a written proposal. Students will complete their proposed work during winter and spring quarters, in ENSC 4880and 4890. Registration restrictions may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Registration Restriction(s): Senior standing and department permission
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • ENSC 4880 - Senior Capstone II: Research and Application

    3 credit hours
    In this course the student team will focus on completing tasks determined in ENSC 4870. This course emphasizes research, design, and modeling work. Depending on the project, students will collect field samples, analyze data, and/or model results. Findings will be disseminated in ENSC 4890.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ENSC 4870
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • ENSC 4890 - Senior Capstone III: Dissemination

    3 credit hours
    In this course the student team will focus on consolidating data and findings from ENSC 4880. They will disseminate these results via a project report and through oral presentations. This course emphasizes data analysis and written and oral communication. Students will present their projects at Project’s Day.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ENSC 4880
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ENSC 4910 - Special Topic

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ENSC 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ENSC 4990 - Directed Research

    1 to 5 credit hours

Environmental Studies

  
  • EVST 1600 - Environmental Perspectives

    5 credit hours
    Introduces students to the nature of interdisciplinary ecological inquiry at the heart of the field of environmental studies. Cultivates the capacity for such inquiry by bringing ideas and insights from the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities simultaneously to bear on a range of current environmental issues of both local and global relevance. Course material will be presented through a combination of lectures, films or other media, and discussions, and students will be required to demonstrate their knowledge of current issues and to develop their reflective and synthetic skills through a variety of integrative assignments and collaborative projects.

  
  • EVST 2100 - Natural History: Theory and Practice

    5 credit hours
    Natural history is a way of inquiry into nature characterized by systematic empirical investigation and interpretation of botanical, zoological, and geological phenomena in their natural habitats. Students will develop observational, analytical, and interpretive skills in varied field settings through qualitative and quantitative research methodologies that focus on the origins and evolution of selected flora, fauna, and landscape features as well as their integration into ecological wholes. Lecture/discussion topics include the historical context of natural history, cultural differences between field and laboratory science, and the artistic and literary dimensions of natural history. Students conduct a quarter-long field research project through preparation of an extensive formal natural-history journal.

  
  • EVST 2150 - Essentials of Geology

    5 credit hours
    Investigates the geological processes that have built and continue to transform the Earth, shaping the Earth’s crust and sculpting its surface. Topics include mineral and rock formation, volcanic eruptions, weathering and metamorphism, and the crucial effects of water on the skin of the Earth. The course will involve cultivating a familiarity and facility with the scientific method involved in geological research, its similarities to and differences from other modes of learning about the natural world, and its role in optimizing human relations with nonhuman nature. Instructional methods will involve occasional lectures, in-class experiments, small group work, and labs and field trips.

  
  • EVST 2200 - Principles of Ecology

    5 credit hours
    The study of the basic structure and function of natural ecosystem: energy flow and nutrient cycling. Exploration of the earth’s major biomes and their importance to human existence. Case studies of human impacts on ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest and the practical application of ecological theory to ecosystem restoration. Four lecture/discussion hours, three laboratory hours per week; one weekend field trip.

  
  • EVST 2450 - Environmental Education

    5 credit hours
    Explores the goals, theory, and practice of environmental education. Surveys relevant materials and methods both for school settings and for more informal contexts such as environmental learning centers, nature centers, and field-based natural history education. Students gain practical skills in curriculum design by developing learning materials for particular topics.

  
  • EVST 2960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • EVST 3000 - Environmental Politics

    5 credit hours
    Examines the issue of environmental stewardship and critically analyzes the American political process as a means of achieving environmental protection at the local, national, and global levels of governance. Emphasis is on understanding the nature and causes of the current ecological crisis, on noting the effects of the contemporary human pursuit of economic growth, and on developing a successful political strategy for solving these problems. Class periods will involve informal lectures and discussion and a service learning component.

  
  • EVST 3010 - Make your Message Matter: Communication Skills for Leaders

    5 credit hours
    This course is for students who wish to learn how to communicate more effectively with the media and the general public. This practical hands-on course will offer numerous tips and techniques to achieve your media and messaging goals. Students will write, role-play in a variety of situations, including press conferences, interviews, crises requiring rapid decision-making and adaptive use of social media such as Twitter and Facebook. While too many people view the media as an impenetrable force at best, or adversary at worst, the instructors will show you how to break down barriers among government, nonprofits and the media to advance your cause. Cross-listed with PUBA 3010.

    Terms Typically Offered: winter
  
  • EVST 3050 - Economics and the Environment

    5 credit hours
    How much fertilizer and pesticide pollution is too much? What role should government play in regulating the environment?How do we stop depletion of fisheries? Will “clean technology” lay the foundation for cities’ sustainable future? This course provides an introduction to the analytical tools used by economists to answer these and other important policy questions. The course presents an overview of environmental, natural resource, and ecological economics concepts with practical application to our most pressing environmental challenges. The first portion of the course focuses on the basic microeconomic theories that will be used throughout the quarter. The remainder of the course examines how economic theories and tools help us understand natural resource management (forests, fisheries, water, pollution control, etc.) and ecological economics. Course material will be presented through a combination of lectures, films and other media, and class discussions.

  
  • EVST 3240 - Religion and Ecology

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - THRS 3240
    This course explores the relationship between environmental issues and religion. Students will learn about a variety of religious traditions (Daoism, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Indigenous Traditions, nature spirituality, and so forth) and their responses to a number of ecological issues (climate change, loss of biodiversity, air and water pollution as it relates to human health, and more). While this class will primarily be a seminar style course, it will also incorporate multimedia, food, and local trips into the learning experience.

    Registration Restriction(s): Majors only
  
  • EVST 3400 - Research Design and Statistics

    5 credit hours
    An introduction to the concepts and practice of data gathering and analysis in relation to environmental and public policy issues. Topics covered include the specification of questions to guide inquiry, the gathering of data, descriptive statistics and graphic presentations, and statistical hypothesis testing. Students will design, implement, analyze, and present the results of a research study of social or environmental significance. Cross-listed with PUBA 440.

  
  • EVST 3500 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    5 credit hours
    GIS is a vibrant and pervasive technology for investigating and understanding societal, environmental and ecological problems (and more) from a spatial perspective. This course introduces students to GIS concepts, such as posing spatial questions, finding and using GIS data, cartographic literacy and multi-step spatial problem solving. Students will learn how to acquire, map and analyze spatial data (in raster and vector forms) in order to assess a variety of questions, and will learn to communicate results in spatially empowered decision making. Cross-listed with ENSC 3500.

  
  • EVST 3650 - Environmental Psychology

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - EVST 3910: Ecopsychology
    Expands the study of the human psyche outward to include its interactive relations with the larger natural and built environments. It examines the influence of these environments on human health and well-being and draws on quantitative and qualitative research to illuminate how perceptions and attitudes about the environment are formed and how they function. Students will explore the psychological and social-psychological roots of negative or unsustainable environmental behavior and will develop strategies for changing such behavior and cultivating more positive individual actions and societal patterns and policies.

    Terms Typically Offered: winter
  
  • EVST 3700 - Intermediate Geographic Information Systems

    3 to 5 credit hours
    Course builds on basic GIS principles and skills to develop further expertise in GIS analysis and perform professional-level GIS work. Students will learn to perform basic statistical and multi-step analysis of GIS data, apply topology rules, execute vector and raster analysis tasks, credit, edit and assess quality of GIS data, customize and augment ArcGIS, and make professional quality maps to answer an socio-environmental question sand communicate results. Emphasis is placed on real-world GIS assignments and applications in various subject areas. Students completing the 5-credit option are expected to complete an independent research project. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): EVST 3500 or ENSC 3500
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • EVST 3740 - Acoustic Ecology

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - formerly offered as Special Topics
    Much of our modern effort to understand the world around us is mediated by our sense of sight “we say “I see” to mean “I understand.” In this course we will pursue a different path. We will direct our sustained attention to the dynamic realm of sound, shifting the balance of our sensorium from eye to ear. We will begin by studying natural sounds, especially animal communication, and will then examine the growing acoustical footprint of modern urban and industrial civilization. We will also examine the physiological, psychological, social, and ecological aspects of noise pollution, including the influence of electronic communication, and the practical, legal, and ethical issues regarding its mitigation. We’ll cultivate listening sensitivities and recording capabilities, will conduct field investigations of local soundscapes, and will develop strategies for orchestrating the soundscape to create a more equitable and sustainable sound environment. Class periods will involve some brief lectures, discussions, audios and videos, “ear cleaning” exercises, field trips, and small group work.

  
  • EVST 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • EVST 3960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • EVST 4740 - International Environmental Governance

    5 credit hours
    Examines the issues and challenges involved in managing environmental resources of global importance such as forests, biodiversity, air, oceans, and our climate. Focus is on the design, implementation, and effectiveness of international environmental conventions and considers the conditions when conventions succeed or fail.

  
  • EVST 4750 - Impact Statement Analysis

    2 credit hours
    Stages of preparation of Environmental Impact Studies (EIS). Analysis of effects of EIS, roles of National and State Environmental Protection Acts. Significance of EIS for environmental justice.

    Prerequisite Course(s): junior standing
  
  • EVST 4830 - Sustainable Development in the Tropics

    5 credit hours
    Examines sustainable development by analyzing the tensions between conservation and development in tropical biodiversity conservation. Particular attention is paid to the actors and the cultural, economic, and biophysical conditions of the tropics that make sustainable development and conservation particularly challenging. Course objectives are to look at the different perspectives on sustainable development and conservation and to consider the pros and cons of various strategies to conserve the environment and promote development.

  
  • EVST 4840 - Environmental Justice

    5 credit hours
    Examines the intersecting ecological, sociological, and moral dimensions of human environmental impacts, particularly with regard to marginalized peoples. Students will gain an understanding of basic environmental justice issues, will develop analytical skills of quantitative assessment, map interpretation, and other forms of problem solving, and will research, critically evaluate, and propose solutions for specific cases of possible environmental injustice.

  
  • EVST 4860 - Children and Nature

    5 credit hours
    Examines the relationship between children and the natural world from multiple perspectives. Topics include the significance of this relationship in child development, historical changes and contemporary concerns regarding the relationship, and the development of recommendations for improving child-nature relations. Implications for environmental sustainability and environmental education will be highlighted.

  
  • EVST 4900 - Senior Synthesis: Capstone

    5 credit hours
    The Senior Synthesis course provides students with an opportunity to connect knowledge and skills acquired in the University Core to those acquired through courses in the Environmental Studies program. Students will complete a research report in alignment with their Specialization in Environmental Studies. Written research report includes standard professional paper components: abstract, introduction, methodology, results, data analysis, conclusions, bibliography. Public presentation of research study and results. Major requirement; satisfies core curriculum senior synthesis. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Registration Restriction(s): Senior standing; majors only
  
  • EVST 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • EVST 4950 - Internship

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • EVST 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • EVST 4990 - Directed Research

    1 to 5 credit hours

Film Studies

Courses that fulfill requirements for the Film Studies major and the core curriculum are designated by the following code:

GN - Genre
VS - Visual Storytelling
IC - International Cinema
ST - Special Topics in Film Studies

  
  • FILM 3000 - Introduction to Film Analysis

    5 credit hours
    This foundational course in film studies is a requirement for all majors and minors and is intended as a prerequisite for all subsequent film classes. It introduces you to fundamental areas of film form: the frame, narrative, mise-en-sce, cinematography, editing, performance, and sound, offering you a vocabulary for the formal analysis of film aesthetics. We study the operations of each of these formal parts in detail and then consider how they work together. This course is an introduction to the specific critical methods necessary to describe, analyze, and appreciate the film text.

  
  • FILM 3020 - History of Film

    5 credit hours
    A survey of the history of narrative film from the beginnings in the late 19th century through the 1960s. The course will cover such major technical developments as sound and color, and national movements and film styles such as Soviet Montage, German Expressionism and Italian neo-realism. The films to be studied will include a selection of works from American and international cinema.

  
  • FILM 3120 - Silent Film

    5 credit hours
    An introduction to the history of silent film, from its beginnings in France and America through its expansion and development throughout the world. Through a study of how film techniques developed to solve the problems of creating narrative through moving pictures, students will understand how those developments underlie the cinematic practices of today. Films to be studied will be drawn from both Western and non- Western traditions, including American, European, Soviet, Chinese and Japanese productions.

  
  • FILM 3150 - Independent Film

    5 credit hours
    Beginning with the films of John Cassavetes, a study of the aesthetics, subject matter, financing, production, distribution and exhibition of American independent film. Among the filmmakers who may be considered are Dennis Hopper, David Lynch, the Coen brothers, Spike Lee, Jim Jarmusch, John Waters, John Sayles, and Barbara Koppel.

 

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