Jun 28, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Electrical and Computer Engineering

  
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    ECEGR 4150 - Power Electronics

    4 credit hours
    Basic topologies and operating principles of switching power converters. Half-wave, bridge, and polyphase rectifier circuits. Phase control converters. Output control and dynamic models.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710 and ECEGR 3120
  
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    ECEGR 4160 - Active Networks and Filters

    4 credit hours
    Design of active filters. Operational amplifier circuits. Approximation of frequency response characteristics. Sensitivity. Frequency transformations. Active two-port networks. Simulation of passive elements. Switched capacitor filters.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710
  
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    ECEGR 4220 - Advanced Digital Design

    4 credit hours
    Microprocessor-based systems design procedures; LSI circuit specifications and interconnect design; programmable logic; logic simulation; prototype construction; system debug techniques; hands-on design carried out in teams.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 2220
  
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    ECEGR 4310 - Distributed Systems

    4 credit hours
    Analysis of distributed systems; steady-state and transient analysis of loss-less lines, lossy lines; waveguides.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior candidacy
    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3110, PHYS 1230
  
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    ECEGR 4320 - Microwave Systems

    4 credit hours
    Propagation of electromagnetic waves and interaction with materials, guided waves, and passive and active devices, microstrip and integrated circuits.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710 and ECEGR 3300 or PHYS 3300
  
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    ECEGR 4330 - Introduction to Antennas

    4 credit hours
    Electromagnetic waves and radiating systems used in telecommunications. Software simulation of antenna radiation patterns. Frequency spectra used in modern communications and their effect on antenna design.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710 and ECEGR 3300 or PHYS 3300
  
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    ECEGR 4331 - Antennas Laboratory

    2 credit hours
    A laboratory covering the measurement and simulation of wire and aperture antenna radiation patterns.

    Co-requisite Course(s): ECEGR 3300 or PHYS 3300
  
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    ECEGR 4340 - Modern Optics

    4 credit hours
    Introduction to modern optics consisting of ray optics; scalar wave optics; diffraction; interferometry; vector wave optics and polarization; Gaussian beam optics; Fourier optics, including image processing, spatial filtering, and holography; optical waveguides and fibers; optical resonators; laser amplifiers and systems; semiconductor lasers and detectors; optical switching and computing. Optional labs in holography and fiber optics.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710 or PHYS 2050; PHYS 3300 or ECEGR 3300
  
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    ECEGR 4410 - Control Systems

    4 credit hours
    Fundamentals of classical and modern system theory; analysis and design of closed-loop systems with emphasis on stability and transient response using Nyquist, Bode, root-locus, and state-space techniques.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710
  
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    ECEGR 4420 - Robotic Manipulators

    4 credit hours
    Analysis and control of robotic manipulators; predicting location and orientation; planning trajectories; development of programs for specific tasks; integration of feedback data.

    Prerequisite Course(s): MATH 2320; ECEGR 3000 or MEGR 2810
  
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    ECEGR 4510 - Electromechanical Energy Conversion

    4 credit hours
    Electromechanical energy conversion principles and design. Application, analysis and details of electromechanical devices, such as relays, transformers, rotating machinery.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3500
    Terms Typically Offered: SQ
  
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    ECEGR 4511 - Electromechanical Energy Conversion Laboratory

    2 credit hours
    A laboratory covering the principles and practice of electromechanical energy conversion devices.

    Co-requisite Course(s): ECEGR 4510
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ
  
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    ECEGR 4520 - Power Systems

    4 credit hours
    Analysis of power systems: symmetrical components, power system parameters, steady-state operation, economic dispatch, frequency control, symmetrical and non-symmetrical faults.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3500
    Terms Typically Offered: SQ
  
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    ECEGR 4530 - Renewable Energy Systems

    4 credit hours
    Fundamentals of renewable energy conversion methods and the environmental, economic and societal impact. Conversion methods studied include: solar photovoltaic, solar thermal and wind. Integration of renewable resources into the bulk transmission system. Sustainability and efficiency considerations. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 2100
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ
  
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    ECEGR 4610 - Communication Systems

    4 credit hours
    Analysis and transmission of signals in the context of amplitude and angle modulations. Sampling, analog-to-digital conversion, and basic principles of digital data transmission. Performance analysis of communication systems in the presence of noise.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710 and MATH 2310
  
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    ECEGR 4611 - Communications Laboratory

    2 credit hours
    A laboratory covering basic principles of encoding, modulation, and transmission of electronic signals. One-hour lecture and one four-hour laboratory per week.

    Co-requisite Course(s): ECEGR 4610
  
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    ECEGR 4620 - Data Communication Networks

    4 credit hours
    An introduction to the concepts and methods of data communication. Systems, protocols, and controls used in data transfer. Media employed for data transmission and multiplexing techniques. Long-range and local networks used in data and computer communications.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 1200; CPSC 3500
  
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    ECEGR 4630 - Wireless Communications Systems

    4 credit hours
    An introduction to issues and problems associated with modern wireless communications systems. Radio wave systems. Multipath and fading. Frequency planning. Cellular communications. Registration.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710 and PHYS 1230
  
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    ECEGR 4640 - Internet of Things

    4 credit hours
    Introduction to the Internet of Things (IoT); real-world applications of IoT; embedded systems; systems integration approach; network layering and the internet; communication protocols; security aspects of IoT; IoT system design and testing.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 2020
  
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    ECEGR 4701 - Data Acquisition Laboratory

    2 credit hours
    Data acquisition techniques and principles. Gaining facility with typical hardware and prevalent software applications for data acquisition, both direct and indirect. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 1200; ECEGR 2000; ECEGR 2010
  
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    ECEGR 4710 - Digital Signal Processing

    4 credit hours
    Linear, time invariant, discrete systems; finite moving average and recursive digital filters; Z-transform; discrete Fourier transform; fast Fourier transform.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710
  
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    ECEGR 4711 - Digital Signal Processing Laboratory

    2 credit hours
    Use of modern Digital Signal Processing (DSP) software development systems. Debugging and analysis of program operation on DSP integrated circuits. DSP IC architectures. Analysis of test data in time and frequency domains.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3710
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): ECEGR 4710
  
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    ECEGR 4720 - Introduction to Digital Image Processing

    4 credit hours
    Introduction to fundamental principles and techniques for digital image processing including image analysis, feature extraction, segmentation, enhancement, restoration, and compression. Hands-on experience through MATLAB laboratory exercises and projects. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 1200; ECEGR 3000
  
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    ECEGR 4730 - Introduction to Data Compression

    4 credit hours
    Introduction to fundamental principles and techniques of data compression. Basic information theory: entropy. Lossless data compression techniques: Huffman coding, arithmetic coding, and dictionary methods. Use of context, structure, and prediction to improve compression. Image compression: vector quantization, DCT coding, wavelet coding. Video compression: motion compensation and prediction. Audio compression: Image, video, and audio compression standards.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 3000
  
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    ECEGR 4740 - Mathematical Models of Near-Shore Phenomena

    5 credit hours
    Basic fluid properties; mass and momentum conservation; linear and nonlinear models of waves in the ocean; partial differential equations; dispersion relations; Fourier methods; and wave shoaling. The course includes a required trip to Chile with related fees.

    Registration Restriction(s): Permission of instructor
    Prerequisite Course(s): MATH 2340 with a grade of B or better
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter of even years
  
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    ECEGR 4750 - Machine Learning I: Optimization, Prediction, and Pattern Recognition in Complex Systems

    5 credit hours
    This is a project-based class that introduces neural nets, fuzzy systems, deep learning, kernel methods, Bayesian learning, and evolutionary algorithms for optimization, prediction, and classification. Algorithms are learned through implementation exercises and a team project. Parallel readings on complex systems provide the biological, philosophical, and historical background of machine learning by tracing its roots in neurobiology, sociobiology, statistics, and physics.

    Prerequisite Course(s): MATH 2320
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): MATH 2310
    Terms Typically Offered: fall
  
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    ECEGR 4760 - Machine Learning II: Contemporary and Emerging Techniques

    4 credit hours
    This is a project-based class that builds on Machine Learning I by introducing further deep-learning paradigms and Bayesian nonparametrics, ensemble, bootstrap, and mixture methods, Markov processes, and additional paradigms in evolutionary computing, swarm intelligence, and multi-valued logic.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ECEGR 4750
  
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    ECEGR 4870 - Engineering Design I

    3 credit hours
    A year-long capstone team design project that draws upon all of the student's previous experience, both technical and non-technical. Projects require students to investigate and apply concepts not covered in course work and to master engineering tools needed to complete the assigned task. Particular emphasis is placed upon project organization and management, principles of engineering design, oral and written communication, and professionalism and ethics. In ECEGR 4870, student teams are formed and industrially-sponsored design problems are assigned. Project proposals are written, critiqued, and presented. In ECEGR 4880 and 4890, problem solutions are developed and implemented, culminating in a formal presentation of results. In addition to regularly-scheduled lectures, students are expected to devote significant time to design team activities. The three courses must be taken as a continuous sequence. The Engineering Design sequence fulfills the interdisciplinary and synthesis requirements of the university core.

    Registration Restriction(s): Advanced junior or senior standing in engineering
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ
  
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    ECEGR 4880 - Engineering Design II

    4 credit hours
    A year-long capstone team design project that draws upon all of the student's previous experience, both technical and non-technical. Projects require students to investigate and apply concepts not covered in course work and to master engineering tools needed to complete the assigned task. Particular emphasis is placed upon project organization and management, principles of engineering design, oral and written communication, and professionalism and ethics. In ECEGR 4870, student teams are formed and industrially-sponsored design problems are assigned. Project proposals are written, critiqued, and presented. In ECEGR 4880 and 4890, problem solutions are developed and implemented, culminating in a formal presentation of results. In addition to regularly-scheduled lectures, students are expected to devote significant time to design team activities. The three courses must be taken as a continuous sequence. The Engineering Design sequence fulfills the interdisciplinary and synthesis requirements of the university core.

    Registration Restriction(s): Advanced junior or senior standing in engineering
    Terms Typically Offered: WQ
  
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    ECEGR 4890 - Engineering Design III

    3 credit hours
    A year-long capstone team design project that draws upon all of the student's previous experience, both technical and non-technical. Projects require students to investigate and apply concepts not covered in course work and to master engineering tools needed to complete the assigned task. Particular emphasis is placed upon project organization and management, principles of engineering design, oral and written communication, and professionalism and ethics. In ECEGR 4870, student teams are formed and industrially-sponsored design problems are assigned. Project proposals are written, critiqued, and presented. In ECEGR 4880 and 4890, problem solutions are developed and implemented, culminating in a formal presentation of results. In addition to regularly-scheduled lectures, students are expected to devote significant time to design team activities. The three courses must be taken as a continuous sequence. The Engineering Design sequence fulfills the interdisciplinary and synthesis requirements of the university core.

    Registration Restriction(s): Advanced junior or senior standing in engineering
    Terms Typically Offered: SQ
  
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    ECEGR 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ, WQ, SQ
  
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    ECEGR 4940 - Undergraduate Design Project

    1 to 5 credit hours
    An independent design experience under the supervision of a faculty advisor and culminating in the construction of a prototype of the design.

    Registration Restriction(s): Permission of the faculty advisor
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ, WQ, SQ, RQ
  
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    ECEGR 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ, WQ, SQ, RQ
  
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    ECEGR 4990 - Undergraduate Research

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Research into a topic within electrical or computer engineering in collaboration with a faculty advisor culminating in a written or oral presentation.

    Registration Restriction(s): Permission of faculty advisor
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ, WQ, SQ, RQ

English

Courses that fulfill requirements for the English major are designated by the following codes:

CW - Multi-Genre Creative Writing
CWD - Creative Writing Drama/Film
CWF - Creative Writing Fiction
CWN - Creative Writing Non-Fiction
CWP - Creative Writing Poetry
INT - Intercultural/Intersectional
Pre-1800 - Pre-1800 Literature
1800-Pres - 1800-Present Literature
 

 



 

  
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    ENGL 1010 - Basic Writing

    5 credit hours
    Instruction and practice in basic writing skills with emphasis on generating, organizing, and developing ideas in paragraphs and short essays, as well as controlling sentence structure, punctuation, and standard usage. Through focus on the writing process, the course aims to increase students' self-confidence as writers. Credits count toward graduation, but do not satisfy core writing requirements.

    Terms Typically Offered: Offered by English Language Program, not English Dept
  
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    ENGL 1910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Not offered
  
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    ENGL 1960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Not offered
  
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    ENGL 2000 - Literary Studies

    5 credit hours
    An introduction to the language of literary analysis and to the methods of literary criticism through a variety of genres, such as fiction, poetry, or drama. Required of English and English/Creative Writing majors and minors.

    Terms Typically Offered: Every quarter
  
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    ENGL 2010 - Encountering British Literatures

    5 credit hours
    A study of significant British texts in their historical and cultural contexts with an emphasis on close reading. The course examines a variety of voices, both canonical and non-canonical, from distinct literary periods.

    Terms Typically Offered: Every quarter
  
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    ENGL 2020 - Encountering American Literatures

    5 credit hours
    An examinationof American literary historywith an emphasis on the close reading oftexts that illustrate distinct literary periods. The course focuses on a range of American voices and expressions, while also acknowledging the role the canon plays in literary history.

    Terms Typically Offered: Every quarter
  
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    ENGL 2030 - Encountering Intercultural Literatures

    5 credit hours
    An examination of literatures that engagecultural boundaries and the issue of communicating across social and cultural differences. Readings in the course address multiculturalthemes and topics, and focus especially on the role that intersections among race, gender, sexuality, class, and/or national or global history play in the production and reception of literary texts.

    Terms Typically Offered: Every quarter
  
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    ENGL 2050 - Encountering Creative Writing

    5 credit hours
    An introduction to the central craft principles of creative writing, applied in at least two different genres.

    Terms Typically Offered: Once or twice a year
  
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    ENGL 2100 - Intermediate College Writing

    3 credit hours
    Teaches skills of invention, arrangement, and style for producing short, clear academic papers. Emphasis on revision helps students learn strategies for generating ideas, organizing a paper effectively, improving style, and producing clear, persuasive writing. Aimed particularly at students who want to gain greater confidence in their writing.

    Terms Typically Offered: Not currently offered
  
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    ENGL 2110 - Writing the Research Paper

    3 credit hours
    Teaches skills of inquiry, analysis, and argument for research writing in upper-division courses. Students learn to do efficient library and Internet research, evaluate sources critically, and incorporate sources into their own arguments to produce insightful, professionally documented academic papers.

    Terms Typically Offered: Not currently offered
  
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    ENGL 2120 - Scientific/Technical Writing

    3 credit hours
    Teaches academic writing within the disciplinary contexts of the physical and social sciences, engineering, nursing, and other scientific or technical fields. Students learn to write an empirical research report and to complete short assignments requiring concise, clear writing on technical or scientific subjects.

    Terms Typically Offered: Not currently offered
  
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    ENGL 2130 - Grammar and Editing

    2 credit hours
    Teaches skills of grammatical analysis for eliminating errors in punctuation, usage, and sentence structure. Students learn to understand and apply the rules of Standard American Edited English to their own prose to improve correctness, gracefulness, and style.

  
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    ENGL 2135 - Grammar and Punctuation

    2 credit hours
    Through the careful study of grammar and mechanics this course will give students greater confidence about their own writing and also help them become better proofreaders and editors of others' materials. The course focuses on improving mastery over basic grammar and punctuation, learning to identify and fix errors in written materials, and developing the knowledge of a broad spectrum of resources to assist when questions about grammar, mechanics, and usage arise in the future.

    Terms Typically Offered: Every WQ
  
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    ENGL 2138 - Writing, Editing, and Style

    3 credit hours
    This course moves beyond a "micro" focus on grammar and punctuation basics to work on "macro" issues of polish and persuasion. Students learn to recognize and recreate varying complexity in sentence structure and expression; to understand appropriate writing styles for different contexts; and to strengthen their writing through careful attention to transitions, strong/active word choice, coherence, and persuasiveness.

    Prerequisite Course(s): UCOR 1100: Academic Writing Seminar or equivalent course
    Terms Typically Offered: Every SQ
  
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    ENGL 2520 - Readings in British Literature I

    5 credit hours
    A study of major British writers from the Medieval Period to the Eighteenth Century. Required of English/Creative Writing majors.

  
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    ENGL 2530 - Readings in British Literature II

    5 credit hours
    A study of major British writers from the Eighteenth Century to the Modern Period. Required of English/Creative Writing majors.

  
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    ENGL 2540 - Readings in American Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of American writers from the Colonial through the Modern Period. Required of English/Creative Writing majors.

  
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    ENGL 2910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Not currently offered
  
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    ENGL 2960 - Directed Study

    2 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Not currently offered
  
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    ENGL 3010 - Lit to 1500 Context and Theory

    5 credit hours
    An "in context" course satisfies the requirement in that literary area. At the same time, it prepares students for other 3000-level literature courses and for the advanced work required in 4000-level literature courses. Students will learn (1) how to analyze literary texts within their cultural and historical context; (2) how to negotiate different theoretical perspectives, understanding how different interpretations of a literary text are shaped by the critic's critical assumptions and reading practices; and (3) how to write an insightful 8-12 page researched critical argument about a literary work using the conventions of the Modern Language Association. English majors are advised to complete an "in Context" course before taking a 4000-level literature course. Pre-1800.

    Terms Typically Offered: One time per year, usually FQ
  
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    ENGL 3011 - Lit 1500-1800 Context and Theory

    5 credit hours
    An "in context" course satisfies the requirement in that literary area. At the same time, it prepares students for other 3000-level literature courses and for the advanced work required in 4000-level literature courses. Students will learn (1) how to analyze literary texts within their cultural and historical context; (2) how to negotiate different theoretical perspectives, understanding how different interpretations of a literary text are shaped by the critic's critical assumptions and reading practices; and (3) how to write an insightful 8-12 page researched critical argument about a literary work using the conventions of the Modern Language Association. English majors are advised to complete an "in Context" course before taking a 4000-level literature course. Pre-1800.

    Terms Typically Offered: FQ or WQ
  
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    ENGL 3012 - Lit 1800 - Present Context and Theory

    5 credit hours
    An "in context" course satisfies the requirement in that literary area. At the same time, it prepares students for other 3000-level literature courses and for the advanced work required in 4000-level literature courses. Students will learn (1) how to analyze literary texts within their cultural and historical context; (2) how to negotiate different theoretical perspectives, understanding how different interpretations of a literary text are shaped by the critic's critical assumptions and reading practices; and (3) how to write an insightful 8-12 page researched critical argument about a literary work using the conventions of the Modern Language Association. English majors are advised to complete an "in Context" course before taking a 4000-level literature course. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: One time per year
  
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    ENGL 3013 - American Literature Context and Theory

    5 credit hours
    An "in context" course satisfies the requirement in that literary area. At the same time, it prepares students for other 3000-level literature courses and for the advanced work required in 4000-level literature courses. Students will learn (1) how to analyze literary texts within their cultural and historical context; (2) how to negotiate different theoretical perspectives, understanding how different interpretations of a literary text are shaped by the critic's critical assumptions and reading practices; and (3) how to write an insightful 8-12 page researched critical argument about a literary work using the conventions of the Modern Language Association. English majors are advised to complete an "in Context" course before taking a 4000-level literature course. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: One time per year
  
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    ENGL 3014 - Intercultural/Intersectional Context and Theory

    5 credit hours
    An "in context" course satisfies the requirement in that literary area. At the same time, it prepares students for other 3000-level literature courses and for the advanced work required in 4000-level literature courses. Students will learn (1) how to analyze literary texts within their cultural and historical context; (2) how to negotiate different theoretical perspectives, understanding how different interpretations of a literary text are shaped by the critic's critical assumptions and reading practices; and (3) how to write an insightful 8-12 page researched critical argument about a literary work using the conventions of the Modern Language Association. English majors are advised to complete an "in Context" course before taking a 4000-level literature course. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: One time per year
  
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    ENGL 3040 - Advanced Writing: Argument and Persuasion

    5 credit hours
    Argumentative writing for a public forum on issues of policy or other significant social issues. Study of the rhetoric of argumentation with attention to the use of evidence, the internal logic of argument, and the appeal to an audience's sympathies and reason. Development of a flexible prose style that can be adapted to a variety of rhetorical situations and audiences.

    Terms Typically Offered: Every WQ
  
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    ENGL 3050 - Composition Theory and Practice

    5 credit hours
    This course has two main objectives: to ground students' writing in a study of composition theory and recent scholarship on writing and to enable students to apply theory in their practice with personal, academic, and civic genres. This course will help future professionals in all fields, particularly teachers, become more versatile, reflective, sophisticated writers.

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
  
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    ENGL 3080 - History of the English Language

    5 credit hours
    A study of the historical development of English and an introduction to linguistics: phonology, morphology, syntax and lexicon in their historical and literary contexts.

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3090 - Tutoring Writing: Theory and Practice

    5 credit hours
    Practical training for students chosen to be tutors in the Writing Center. Study of theories of composition and the role of tutors within the writing process. Strategies for diagnosing writing problems, mastering effective conferencing skills to help writers reduce anxiety, generate ideas, solve organizational problems, and develop a fluent, error-free prose style.

    Terms Typically Offered: Every FQ
  
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    ENGL 3100 - Writers Workshop Abroad

    5 credit hours
    Open to any student who is serious about imaginative writing both as self-expression and as a rigorous means for discovering a place, its people, and its history. Phase I, which provides an introduction to the culture of the country to be visited, is conducted on campus spring quarter. The two-week Phase II unfolds abroad in summer. For English/Creative Writing majors and minors, the course satisfies any "genre" requirement. CW

    Registration Restriction(s): By permission of instructor
    Terms Typically Offered: Every SQ
  
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    ENGL 3110 - Writing Non-Fiction

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to non-fiction genres which use fictional techniques, such as the essay, autobiography, travel writing, interviews, humor, and satire. CWN

    Terms Typically Offered: Every FQ
  
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    ENGL 3120 - Writing the Personal Narrative

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to the personal essay in its many forms, such as the memoir, diary, autobiography, family history, and coming of age narrative. CWN

    Terms Typically Offered: WQ or SQ
  
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    ENGL 3130 - Writing Fiction: Storytelling Principles

    5 credit hours
    A primer in storytelling, this course immerses students in major foundational principles so that they can begin to develop a sound narrative practice of their own. By studying methods of characterization, points of view, story structure, ways to manipulate narrative time, and the like, students learn to write fiction capable of compelling reader interest. CWF

    Terms Typically Offered: FQ and WQ
  
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    ENGL 3140 - Writing Fiction: Longer Forms

    5 credit hours
    This course focuses on the problems and opportunities associated with writing longer fiction forms such as the novelette, the novella, and the novel. Students learn about methods of extended characterization, plotting, the construction of narrative arcs, and other elements of fiction responsible for generating sustained narratives. Additionally, students receive guidance on how to handle the challenges of working on sustained fiction projects. CWF

    Terms Typically Offered: SQ
  
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    ENGL 3150 - Writing Lyric Poetry

    5 credit hours
    Study and practice in the modes and techniques of poetic composition, focusing on the short lyric forms and emotional expression through imagery, metaphor, diction, rhyme, and cadence. CWP

    Terms Typically Offered: Every WQ
  
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    ENGL 3160 - Writing Narrative Poetry

    5 credit hours
    Study and practice of storytelling in poetry using longer narrative forms such as the ballad, the epic, the rhymed tale, and other strategies that emphasize plot and character over feeling. Additional focus on basic skills, such as the use of metaphor, imagery, rhyme, cadence, diction, and selecting the appropriate form for a narrative idea. CWP

    Terms Typically Offered: Every SQ
  
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    ENGL 3170 - Travel Writing

    5 credit hours
    In this creative writing class, we explore various motivations for travel writing "journey, discovery, politics, storytelling, meditation, commerce, and self-discovery" as well as the ethical complexities that accompany them. Students are introduced to the pertinent craft components of storytelling as they relate to travel, and they are invited to write about place, travel, and community in a variety of formats. In addition, we consider commercial aspects of travel writing, including publication venues, paying markets, and the lifestyle of a travel writer. CWF

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
  
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    ENGL 3180 - Writing Scripts

    5 credit hours
    Practice and study of script writing for film and television, emphasizing the genre formulas and the special challenges of collaborative media. CWD

    Terms Typically Offered: One time per year
  
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    ENGL 3210 - The Bible as Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of the Jewish and Christian Scriptures with emphasis on their status as texts that engage and shape a reader's response. Possible works to be studied include: Genesis, Exodus, 1 and 2, Samuel, Job, Isaiah, one of the Gospels, Romans, and Revelation. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3220 - The Literature of Greece and Rome

    5 credit hours
    A study of the literature of the classical world of Greece and Rome. Texts may include such works as The Odyssey, The Oresteia, Oedipus Rex, Antigone, The Trojan Women, and Lysistrata, The Aeneid, a comedy of Plautus, the essays of Cicero, and the satires of Juvenal for the Romans. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Every other year
  
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    ENGL 3230 - Medieval Marvels

    5 credit hours
    An investigation of the category of the marvelous in the Middle Ages. The class considers texts from multiple genres (poetry, prose, history, medicine, travel) in order to complicate our notion not only of the Middle Ages, but of the wondrous. Texts may include: Pliny's Natural History, The Golden Legend, The Trotula, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, Chaucer's Dream Visions, The Wonders of the East, as well as Middle English Romances. Pre-1800; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Every other year
  
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    ENGL 3260 - Dante's Divine Comedy

    5 credit hours
    A study of The Divine Comedy: Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso, with emphasis on its peculiarly medieval synthesis of thought and its contemporary appeal as a literary classic. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Not offered
  
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    ENGL 3270 - Arthurian Romance

    5 credit hours
    A study of British and continental Arthurian works written in the Middle Ages. Two to three weeks will also be devoted to later interpretations of the Arthurian story. Readings may include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Thomas Malory's Morte d 'Arthur, Chrien de Troyes' romances, or Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan. Later works influenced by medieval romance may include Alfred Lord Tennyson's Idylls of the King, or Marion Zimmer Bradley's The Mists of Avalon. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Every other year
  
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    ENGL 3280 - Chaucer

    5 credit hours
    A study of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and other works, such as his short poems or the Troilus. The emphasis is on understanding and appreciating Chaucer's works in the context of 14th century English culture, history and politics. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3310 - Shakespeare in Performance

    5 credit hours
    A study of Shakespeare's plays through live theater and video performances, to discover the problems and opportunities of each script as well as those aspects of the plays that reveal themselves only in performance. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3320 - Shakespeare

    5 credit hours
    A study of Shakespeare's works with attention to dramaturgy, language, and themes, as well as to the political, religious, and cultural contexts of Shakespeare's time. Focusing on close reading of selected plays, the course examines such interpretive controversies as concepts of self, sexuality, family, power, and cosmic meaning. The course may also include selected sonnets or narrative poems. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3330 - Renaissance Drama

    5 credit hours
    A study of Renaissance playwrights, excluding Shakespeare, who contributed significantly to the development of English theater. The course may emphasize a subgenre (such as tragedy or comedy), time period (such as the reign of Queen Elizabeth), or theme (such as "Rewritings of Shakespeare"). Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3340 - Renaissance Heroism: Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Milton

    5 credit hours
    An examination of conflicting visions of heroism in Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Milton in light of the political, cultural, and social history of 16th and 17th century England. Students will examine selected plays of Marlowe and Shakespeare, as well as Milton's Paradise Lost, from the perspective of new historicism and other critical theories. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3350 - The Renaissance Lyric

    5 credit hours
    A study of the turbulent period from the 1530s to the 1660s when poets freely explored new poetic modes and experimented with old ones. This course traces the development of the English Renaissance lyric by examining the works of such poets as Wyatt, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Jonson, Herbert, and Vaughan. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Every other year
  
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    ENGL 3360 - 17th Century Literature: The Rhetoric and Poetics of Modern Revolutions

    5 credit hours
    A study of the literature of a turbulent period marked by cultural shifts in English politics, economics, and education that affected the development of English literature in many ways. Donne, Herbert, Jonson, Herrick, Crashaw, Milton, and other poets expanded English poetry in form and subject; Dryden, Congreve, Davenant, and other playwrights experimented with new dramatic forms, such as heroic drama, comedy of manners, and opera; and writers such as Bacon, Walton, Dryden and Sprat helped to establish the rules for modern English prose. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Every other year
  
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    ENGL 3380 - Restoration and 18th Century Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of the literature of the Restoration and eighteenth century (1660-1800), focusing on such issues as oppression, gender, and race, and on major innovations in prose narratives, satires, and poetry. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3400 - British Romanticism

    5 credit hours
    An analysis and discussion of the major works of the Romantic period with emphasis on the poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Pre-1800

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3410 - Late 19th Century Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of English literature beginning with Jane Austen and ending with writers of the Victorian Period in 1903. Readings will emphasize the issues important to major writers, such as socio-political and economic development and the purpose of art in an age marked by momentous and intimidating social changes, startling inventions, prodigious energies. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Every other year
  
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    ENGL 3420 - Clash of Ideals: The Issue of Progress in 19th Century Literature

    5 credit hours
    An exploration of the ways the modern industrial nation-state affected changes in the literature of England, continental Europe, and Russia from 1800 to around 1910, particularly controversies about religion and science, mass production and art for art's sake, sentimentalism and rationalism, and the proper role of government in advancing the common good. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3430 - 19th Century European Novel

    5 credit hours
    A study of novels written from the French Revolution to the Fin de Sile that reflect the intellectual milieu of the period. Authors may include Goethe, Freytag, de Sta, Baudelaire, Stendhal, Hugo, Balzac, Dumas, Flaubert, Sand, Zola, Manzoni, Tolstoy, and Dostoyevsky. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3440 - Modernism in Art and Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of the movement of Modernism as expressed in Western art and literature from 1880 to approximately 1950. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Every RQ
  
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    ENGL 3450 - Irish Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of major texts of the Irish Renaissance and their cultural background in the late 19th century. Writers will include Yeats, Joyce, O'Casey, and Synge. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Every RQ
  
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    ENGL 3460 - Russian Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of classic 19th- and 20th-century examples of the Russian povest' ("tale") by such authors as Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov. Themes may include the "little man" (down-trodden in an unjust society), resurrection and redemption, humor and dignity in the face of chaos, and the steadfast belief in a higher power. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3470 - Modern Drama

    5 credit hours
    A study of drama written between1890 and approximately 1950. The playwrights to be studied might include lbsen, Shaw, Wilde, Chekhov, O'Neill, Pirandello, and Williams. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3510 - American Novelists

    5 credit hours
    A study of the American contribution to the novel up to approximately 1950, with emphasis on the cultural diversity of writers such as Melville, Hawthorne, Twain, Henry James, Cather, Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison, Baldwin, and Oates. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Every other year
  
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    ENGL 3520 - American Poets

    5 credit hours
    A study of the American spirit as sensed through the words of its poets, with special emphasis on Americans' problematic response to nature and to the nation's history from colonial times to the present day. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Every other year
  
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    ENGL 3530 - American Drama

    5 credit hours
    A study of major American playwrights of the 19th and 20th centuries, including such authors as Glaspell, O'Neill, Hellman, Wilder, Hansberry, Guare, Williams, Wilson, Mamet, Miller, Albee, Shepard, and Wasserstein. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3540 - What is Ethnic American Literature?

    5 credit hours
    An exploration not only of the issues and themes common to American writers of color, but of the very concept of an "ethnic American" literature. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: One time every year
  
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    ENGL 3610 - American Renaissance, 1820-1860

    5 credit hours
    A study of nineteenth-century antebellum American literature, including texts by Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Poe, Douglass, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Whitman, and Dickinson. Special attention to the way in which these texts engage issues such as revolution, slavery, nationalism, westward expansion, women's rights, democracy, and war. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3620 - 20th Century American Literature

    5 credit hours
    A survey of the principal authors and currents of thought from 1900 to the present. The course will include novels, poetry, and essays exemplifying such movements as realism, imagism, existentialism, southern agrarianism, and postmodern experimentalism. 1800-Pres

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3630 - Modern African American Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of emerging and diverging traditions of writings by African Americans from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. Works may include those by Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Ellison, Morrison, Schuyler, West, Murray, Gates, Baldwin, and Wilson. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Varied
  
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    ENGL 3720 - Literature of India

    5 credit hours
    An examination of the development of Anglophone writing in India from the late 19th century to the present with an emphasis on the novel. 1800-Pres; INT

    Terms Typically Offered: Approx. every other year
 

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