Apr 15, 2024  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Science

  
  • CPSC 4100 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms

    5 credit hours
    Design of algorithms using divide and conquer, greedy methods, and dynamic programming. Analysis of algorithms, parallel algorithms, and intractability.

    Prerequisite Course(s): A C or better in CPSC 2430 and a C or better in either CPSC 2600 or MATH 3000
  
  • CPSC 4210 - Software Testing and Debugging

    5 credit hours
    Overview of testing and debugging principles. Topics include program analysis, testing adequacy, functional testing, structural testing, unit testing, integration testing, and systematic debugging.

    Prerequisite Course(s): A C or better in one 3000-level CPSC course and a C or better in either CPSC 2600 or MATH 3000
  
  • CPSC 4220 - User Experience Design

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to the user-centered design. Methods, concepts and techniques for lifecycle approaches to user experience design and evaluation including usability and usefulness. Topics include storytelling, sketching, communication of design ideas, prototyping, and evaluation and testing from a user-centered perspective.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in CPSC 3200
  
  • CPSC 4230 - Design Patterns and Refactoring

    5 credit hours
    Categorization of standard design patterns, their use, expected benefits and associated costs. Explication and analysis of creational, interface, structural and behavioral patterns. Use of patterns relative to legacy code, including characteristics of poorly designed code as well as the misapplication of patterns. Examination and application of refactoring, techniques used to modify existing code in order to improve structure or performance.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C (2.00) or better in CPSC 3200
  
  • CPSC 4240 - Software as a Service

    5 credit hours
    Use of modern software development techniques and web-based tools to create and deploy cloud-hosted software applications. Project work by teams of students is an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in CPSC 3200
  
  • CPSC 4250 - Mobile Software Development

    5 credit hours
    Mobile application development with emphasis on software architecture and design, compatibility, usability, and deployment. Students will complete a course project where they develop their own mobile application.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in CPSC 3200
  
  • CPSC 4260 - Refactoring and Software Design

    5 credit hours
    Renaming, re-structuring, object-oriented and large-scale refactorings.  Software design including identifying code smells and hotspots, breaking dependencies for testing, evaluation of software design for longevity, code complexity and readability.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in either CPSC 3200 or CPSC 3400
  
  • CPSC 4300 - Physical Database Design and Optimization

    5 credit hours
    Analysis and conversion of a logical data model to a physical model using a range of storage techniques including partitioning, creating new data types, index organized, clustered, multi-dimensional tables, etc. A major focus is query optimization and retrieval strategies used by major commercial database vendors in both transaction processing and dimensional databases. Other topics to be covered will be security, privileges, distributed processing, and transaction control.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C (2.00) or better in CPSC 3300
  
  • CPSC 4310 - Machine Learning

    5 credit hours
    This course introduces machine learning foundations, concepts, and algorithms and their applications in analyzing massive amounts of data to find interesting patterns that can be used to assist decision making or provide predictions. Topics include decision trees, Bayesian classification, clustering, association rules, time series analysis, neural networks. Students are expected to analyze real-world data.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in CPSC 2430 and C- or better in MATH 2310 and C- or better in MATH 2320
  
  • CPSC 4330 - Big Data Analytics

    5 credit hours
    This course covers the Hadoop architecture and the Hadoop ecosystem of tools. Students will learn to apply Hadoop and related big data technologies such as MapReduce, Hive, and Spark in developing analytics and solving problems that process vast quantities of data.  

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in CPSC 3300
  
  • CPSC 4400 - Compiler Principles and Techniques

    5 credit hours
    Lexical analyzers, grammars, top-down and bottom-up parsing, symbol tables, internal forms and intermediate languages, code generation, code optimization, semantic specifications, error detection and recovery. Use of software tools and standard architectures for compiler construction.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C (2.00) or better in CPSC 2500 and CPSC 3400
  
  • CPSC 4510 - Computer Networks

    5 credit hours
    The study of computer networks and the services built on top of them. Topics include packet-switch and multi-access networks, reliable data transfer, routing and multicasting, Internet protocols (IP, TCP, BGP), Internet architecture, the client-server model, network programming, peer-to-peer networks and security.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C (2.00) or better in CPSC 3500
  
  • CPSC 4520 - Distributed Systems

    5 credit hours
    Distributed systems help programmers aggregate the resource of many networked computers to construct highly available and scalable services. Abstractions, design and implementation techniques used in the construction of scalable, high performance distributed systems. Topics include (but not limited to) multithreading, network programming, consistency, fault tolerance, security and several case studies of distributed systems.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C (2.00) or better in CPSC 3500
  
  • CPSC 4530 - Embedded Systems

    5 credit hours
    Specification, design, implementation and testing of a real time embedded microcomputer systems. Use of the C language and an integrated development environment to develop the major elements of an embedded system. Factors in embedded system design: safety, reliability, communication, and performance.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in CPSC 3500
  
  • CPSC 4600 - Parallel Computing

    5 credit hours
    Fundamentals of parallel computing with an emphasis on parallel programming and algorithms. Parallel algorithmic analysis and development using divide and conquer, map and reduce, and data decomposition. Parallel computing implementations and performance factors.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in CPSC 3500
  
  • CPSC 4610 - Artificial Intelligence

    5 credit hours
    Concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence, with an emphasis on building intelligent agents, environments and systems. Methods and tools for building systems that can interact intelligently with their environment by learning and reasoning about the world.

    Prerequisite Course(s): A C or better in CPSC 3200 and a C or better in either CPSC 2600 or MATH 3000
  
  • CPSC 4700 - Computer Graphics

    5 credit hours
    Fundamentals of image representation and computer graphics. Techniques for computer image synthesis, including line drawing, color representation, surface shading, texture mapping, and programming graphics processors.

    Prerequisite Course(s): A C or better in CPSC 2430 and a C or better in either CPSC 2600 or MATH 3000
  
  • CPSC 4710 - Security in Computing

    5 credit hours
    Fundamental principles of security with emphasis on various aspects of security related to operating systems, networks, databases, and web applications. Discussion on privacy concerns and social and ethical issues related to security.

    Prerequisite Course(s): A C or better in one 3000-level CPSC course and a C or better in either CPSC 2600 or MATH 3000
  
  • CPSC 4800 - Technical Communication and Project Management

    3 credit hours
    Communication and project management skills for computing professionals. Writing, speaking, teamwork, electronic communication and structure and content of software documentation. Planning, cost estimation, scheduling, and managing risks, quality and change. CS Majors are to take this course concurrently with CPSC 4870, the first quarter of the capstone software project course.

    Prerequisite Course(s): UCOR 1100, a C (2.00) or better in CPSC 2430, and permission of chair
  
  • CPSC 4870 - Software Engineering and Project Development I

    5 credit hours
    Principles of software engineering and their application in the planning and execution of a three-quarter-long software development project. Students work in teams to define and carry out software projects from initial requirements statements to final implementation. Activities include project planning and management, as well as analysis, design and implementation of the software project. In the fall quarter, projects are defined and requirement specifications are developed by the project teams. The required software products are then designed and implemented in the winter and spring quarters, culminating in a formal presentation of results at the end of the school year. For students pursuing a degree in computer science, the three courses, CPSC 4870, 4880, and 4890, must be taken as a continuous sequence and together, they fulfill the senior synthesis core requirement.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in all 3000-level computer science courses required in the major, a major GPA of 2.50 or higher, and permission of chair.
    Co-requisite Course(s): CPSC 4800
  
  • CPSC 4880 - Software Engineering and Project Development II

    3 credit hours
    Meets as required to continue software project work initiated in the fall quarter.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C or better in CPSC 4800 and CPSC 4870 and permission of chair
  
  • CPSC 4890 - Software Engineering and Project Development III

    3 credit hours
    Meets as required to complete software projects by end of spring quarter.

    Prerequisite Course(s): C (2.00) or better in CPSC 4880 and permission of chair
  
  • CPSC 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • CPSC 4950 - Internship

    1 to 3 credit hours
    By permission only. Supervised practical training combined with academic studies in which students apply and develop their computer science knowledge and skills working for a business or non-profit institution. Students are required to conduct related academic studies under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Graded CR/F.

    Registration Restriction(s): Only permitted via Internship Request form
  
  • CPSC 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • CPSC 4990 - Directed Research

    1 to 5 credit hours

Contemporary Issues in Social Science

  
  • CISS 1200 - Poverty in the United States

    5 credit hours
    This course is an introduction to economic, political, and theoretical ways of understanding poverty and wealth in the United States. Students will examine historical and contemporary causes of poverty, consider the impact of poverty for individuals and society, and evaluate options and barriers for reform.

  
  • CISS 1910 - Special Topics

    2 to 5 credit hours
  
  • CISS 2500 - Global Poverty

    5 credit hours
    This course studies the phenomenon of global poverty through the discipline of international politics and policy. We will investigate the definitions and measures of poverty, its causes, and potential solutions. The course explores several ongoing and important debates affecting societies around the world - such as the impact of globalization, environmental change, health disparities, and women’s rights - to determine their involvement in persistent poverty.

  
  • CISS 2910 - Special Topics

    2 to 5 credit hours

Criminal Justice

  
  • CRJS 1100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

    5 credit hours
    A survey of criminal justice processes from arrest through release, with attention to the interrelationship between the police, the courts, and corrections. Required for all criminal justice majors.

  
  • CRJS 2000 - Deviance and Social Control

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to psychological and sociological theories of deviance with attention to the development of deviant identity, stigma management, and the cultural construction of deviance and social control of particular individuals and groups.

  
  • CRJS 2090 - Criminology

    5 credit hours
    Interdisciplinary study of the theories of crime and criminal behavior and their application to criminal justice policy and practice. Focus on sociological, psychological, biological, cultural, phenomenological, and routine-activity theories. Required for all criminal justice majors.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100
  
  • CRJS 2100 - Law, Society and Justice

    5 credit hours
    Analysis of theories of law and the meaning of justice in Western culture. Focus on theories of justice and their impact on the criminal justice system, the nature and function of law, the relationship between law and morality, and judicial reasoning.

  
  • CRJS 2910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • CRJS 3010 - Criminal Justice Research Methods

    5 credit hours
    Overview of social science research methods, applied statistical techniques, and statistical software used in criminology and criminal justice. The course is divided into two components: (1) Research design and the research process and (2) Introduction to computer data analysis using SPSS. Focus on the research process including design, literature review, data collection, sampling, data analysis, and presentation. Required for all criminal justice majors.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, 2090; UCOR 1200
  
  • CRJS 3020 - Criminal Justice Statistics

    5 credit hours
    Survey of statistical methods used in the criminal justice field. Focus on the scientific method, hypothesis testing, descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency, probability theory, confidence intervals, frequency distributions, correlation and regression, sampling procedures and distributions, hypothesis testing, contingency tables, measures of association, and chi square, t-tests, analysis of variance, and interpreting research results. Students will develop a tool box to critically examine the value, validity, and appropriate use and interpretation of statistics in criminal justice. Required for all criminal justice majors.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, and CRJS 2090
  
  • CRJS 3030 - Juvenile Justice

    5 credit hours
    Overview of the juvenile justice system and the handling of juveniles by the police, the courts, and corrections. Discussion of contemporary issues in juvenile justice, including youth violence and its prevention and control in American society.

  
  • CRJS 3060 - Police and Society

    5 credit hours
    Study of the role of the police in society with attention to the origins of policing, the nature of police organizations and police work, and the relationship between the police and the public.

  
  • CRJS 3080 - Jails and Prisons

    5 credit hours
    Survey of the history, philosophy, and practices of adult institutional and community corrections. Analysis of contemporary issues in corrections and correctional reform.

  
  • CRJS 3100 - The Criminal Trial and the Courts

    5 credit hours
    Analysis of the structure and function of the American court system with attention to the roles of the judge, prosecutor, defender, defendant, jury, victim, witnesses and court administrator.

  
  • CRJS 3120 - Criminal Law

    5 credit hours
    Study of the criminal law processes from detention to appeal. State and federal rules of criminal procedure. Understanding of policies, due process, self-incrimination, search and seizure, right to counsel, and other constitutional issues. Required for all criminal justice majors.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100
  
  • CRJS 3150 - Criminal Procedure

    5 credit hours
    Overview of constitutional limitations on the criminal justice system, The Bill of Rights, due process and civil liberties, investigative and trial procedures, and criminal procedure from arrest through postconviction. Focus on the rule of law in law enforcement, search and seizure, and arrest, interrogation, identification.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, 3120
  
  • CRJS 3200 - Criminal Investigation

    5 credit hours
    Study of investigative theory and techniques. Focus on investigation of homicide, rape, and violent crime and procedures and forensic techniques used in crime scene investigations.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, 2090
  
  • CRJS 3500 - Reentry and Community Corrections

    5 credit hours
    Overview of the theory and practice of community corrections. Examination of contemporary correctional interventions in community settings, alternatives to incarceration and intermediate sanctions, and issues involving the reintegration and community supervision of offenders.

  
  • CRJS 3600 - Forensic Psychology

    5 credit hours
    Overview of forensic psychology and the nexus between psychology, law, and criminology. Survey of policy, practice, and research in forensic psychology and application of psychology to the criminal justice system and criminal and civil litigation. Topics include: Criminal behavior, the relationship between the criminal justice and mental health systems, ethical guidelines and challenges faced in forensic work, methods and instruments used by forensic psychologists, investigative psychology and offender profiling, the insanity defense and competency determinations, risk assessment and prediction of dangerousness, sex offender treatment, and correctional interventions.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, 2090, PSYC 1200
  
  • CRJS 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • CRJS 3960 - Directed Study

    2 to 5 credit hours
  
  • CRJS 4000 - Victimology

    5 credit hours
    A survey of victimology. Topics include: The impact of crime on victims, measuring crime through victimization, the social and psychological harm resulting from different types of crime, the victim-offender relationship, victim rights movement, public perception of victims and social reaction to victimization, the role of the victim in the criminal justice process, and crime prevention and personal safety. A component of the course will address restorative justice with attention to the differences between restorative and retributive models of justice, restorative justice initiatives in the criminal justice system, the balancing of victim, offender, and citizen needs and rights, and offender, community, and governmental responsibilities in meeting the needs of crime victims.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, 2090
  
  • CRJS 4010 - Criminal Profiling

    5 credit hours
    Study of the differentiation of criminal types in criminal justice policy and practice. Focus on theoretical foundations of typology construction and application of offender typologies and criminological theories to the investigative and adjudication process.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, 2090, 3600
  
  • CRJS 4050 - Gender, Race and Crime

    5 credit hours
    Study of gender and race/ethnicity disparities and discriminatory practices in criminal justice with attention to the ways in which gender and race/ethnicity has been historically addressed in criminological theory. Exploration of feminist and cultural perspectives in understanding crime and its response. Comparisons in offending, police contact, case processing, correctional supervision and confinement, capital punishment, and social response and control of criminal behavior. Topics include: Racial profiling, race and gender disparity versus discrimination at different stages of the criminal justice process, female offending, and male violence against women. Cross-listed with SOCL 4410.

  
  • CRJS 4100 - The Polygraph

    5 credit hours
    Overview of the use of the polygraph in the criminal justice system. Theory, techniques, application, legal and ethical considerations in the use of the polygraph in the criminal justice system.

  
  • CRJS 4200 - Working with Offender Populations

    5 credit hours
    Overview of theory, research, and practice regarding correctional interventions, correctional counseling, and working with juvenile and adult offender populations. Focus on issues arising in working with offenders including personal safety, offender manipulation, balancing treatment/security/management goals, prison subculture, offender needs and adaptation to correctional environments, and general issues central to working with offenders in correctional and criminal justice settings.

  
  • CRJS 4220 - Issues in Contemporary Law Enforcement

    5 credit hours
    Seminar on current issues in contemporary law enforcement. Topics addressed in the course include: The politics of law enforcement, police brutality, the impact of administrative interventions on police discretion, and police strategies such as problem-oriented policing, “hot spot” patrols, paramilitary units, and the criminal investigative process.

  
  • CRJS 4230 - Punishment and Social Theory

    5 credit hours
    Exploration of the major social theories of punishment, historical and contemporary penological practice, and the death penalty and the modern execution process. Focus on society’s justification for punishment as a response to crime and the function and meaning of punishment in modern society. Cross-listed with SOCL 3430.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, 2090
  
  • CRJS 4260 - Terrorism and Homeland Security

    5 credit hours
    An examination of the complex concepts and issues associated with global terrorism, U.S. homeland security, and the role of law enforcement; the events leading to the terror attacks on September 11, 2001, and those events before and after that date leading to the developing concepts and principals commonly associated with homeland security. Topics include historical overviews of U.S. and internatational terrorism, international and domestic terrorism issues, a framework of how the U.S. government has chosen to deal with homeland security and terrorism, the nature of executive level decision-making regarding homeland security issues, legal considerations, natural disasters and homeland security, and the costs of securing America.

  
  • CRJS 4300 - Criminal Justice Organizations

    5 credit hours
    Organizational analysis of criminal justice agencies. Study of organizational theory as it applies to police, courts, and corrections. Focus on ethics, discretion, and decisionmaking at different stages of the criminal justice process with attention to individual-organizational-sociocultural dynamics. Topics include: Police deviance, the courtroom work group, and private/public correctional subcultures. Required for all criminal justice majors.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, 2090
  
  • CRJS 4500 - The Psychopath

    5 credit hours
    Study of psychopathy and its relevance to crime, violence, and the criminal justice system. Exploration of the origin and dynamics of psychopathy with focus on forensic assessment, prediction of dangerousness, and how scientific and popular conceptions of psychopathy shape criminal justice policy and practice.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 1100, 2090
  
  • CRJS 4520 - Serial Murder

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to the origins, nature, and dynamics of serial murder. Review of theory and research on the origins and development of serial murder behavior, the conceptual differences between different types of multiple murder phenomena, gender differences in serial homicide, the role of mental disorder, social and cultural forces, and environmental influences on serial murder, investigating serial murder, understanding victimology, and media attention to serial murder.

  
  • CRJS 4530 - US Marshals Practicum

    1 credit hour
    This course is facilitated by the US Marshals Office and provides students with an inside look at the roles and responsibilities of US Marshals special agents, the range of units within the agency. Topics include: practical problems involving evidence collection and preservation; US Marshal jurisdiction and congressional oversight; structure and operation of USD Marhsal field offices and satellite agencies; fingerprint, forensic, technology, training, and other services; policies and issues: ethics, discipline, communications, drug enforcement, civil rights, and future criminal trends. CR/F grading mandatory.

  
  • CRJS 4540 - DEA Practicum

    1 credit hour
    This course is facilitated by the Drug and Enforcement Administration and provides students with an inside look at the roles and responsibilities of DEA special agents, the range of units within the agency. Topics include: practical problems involving evidence collection and preservation; DEA jurisdiction and congressional oversight; structure and operation of DEA field offices and satellite agencies; fingerprint, forensic, technology, training, and other services; policies and issues: ethics, discipline, communications, drug enforcement, civil rights, and future criminal trends. CR/F grading mandatory.

  
  • CRJS 4550 - ATF Practicum

    1 credit hour
    This is a practicum opportunity facilitated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, & Explosives. Students are provided with an inside look at the roles and responsibilities of ATF special agents and the range of units within the agency. CR/F grading mandatory.

  
  • CRJS 4560 - Forensics Practicum

    3 credit hours
    This is a practicum opportunity associated with the School of Law that exposes students to the interaction between the attorney and the expert witness. Students work with/assist third-year law students enrolled in the School of Law forensics course to prepare, research, interview, depose, and engage in cross and direct examination of expert witnesses in civil and criminal cases. CR/F grading mandatory.

  
  • CRJS 4570 - Trial Skills Practicum

    3 credit hours
    This is a practicum opportunity associated with the School of Law clinic. Students work with law students and faculty to prepare, play a role, and present in a mock trial. CR/F grading mandatory.

  
  • CRJS 4580 - FBI Practicum

    1 credit hour
    This course is facilitated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and provides students with an inside look at the roles and responsibilities of FBI special agents, the range of units within the agency. Topics include: practical problems involving evidence collection and preservation; FBI jurisdiction and congressional oversight; structure and operation of FBI field offices and satellite agencies; fingerprint, forensic, technology, training, and other services; policies and issues: ethics, discipline, communications, drug enforcement, civil rights, and future criminal trends. CR/F grading mandatory.

  
  • CRJS 4590 - Research Assistantship

    1 to 10 credit hours
    Hands-on experience conducting crime and justice-related research. Involvement in all phases of the research process ù literature review, research design, contacting agencies, data collection and analysis, and preparation of a paper for presentation at an academic and/or professional conference. Students may develop an original project or may assist a faculty member with ongoing research. CR/F grading mandatory.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior or senior standing, and instructor permission
    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 3020 and 3010
  
  • CRJS 4600 - Forensic Anthropology

    5 credit hours
    Overview of skeletal biology and its application to medico-legal death investigation. Study of the human skeleton including the individual bones, the major anatomical landmarks, and the range of human variation. Focus on the human skeleton in a medico-legal context including locating covert burials, processing outdoor scenes, determination of biological profile, trauma analysis, cause and manner of death, postmortem interval and methods of positive identification. The course is not designed to make students forensic anthropologists but rather to impart an overall understanding of the discipline and an appreciation for its contributions to forensic science. Cross-listed with ANTH 4610.

  
  • CRJS 4650 - Crime Scene and Medico-legal Death Investigation

    5 credit hours
    In-depth look into crime scene and medico-legal death investigation. The manners, mechanisms, causes of death, and post-mortem changes, and wound interpretation are explored. The student will learn how to apply postmortem conditions to criminal investigations to confirm or refute evidence of wrongful deaths. The course will emphasize crime scene search, recognition of physical evidence, techniques and methods for collection, preservation and transmission for laboratory analysis of evidence, and the courtroom presentation of investigators’ actions at the crime scene. A component of this course will involve development of/participation in a mock crime scene investigation.

    Prerequisite Course(s): CRJS 3200, 4800
  
  • CRJS 4700 - Restorative Justice: Behind Bars

    5 credit hours
    The criminal justice system operates on a traditionally adversarial model that pits people who have committed crimes against people who have not (otherwise known as “law abiding citizens”). When a person commits a crime, the standard societal response involves arrest, prosecution, conviction, sentencing, followed by probation, jail, or prison, and (if in prison, usually) eventual release. This process is formal, adversarial, and rarely involves an opportunity for offenders, victims, and citizens who have a direct stake in a specific offense to collectively identify and address harms, needs, and obligations to make things right (or better) in some meaningful way in the aftermath of crime. An alternative way of responding to crime – restorative justice, has gained a great deal of attention in recent years. Restorative justice principles and practices coexist within the adversarial system. Restorative Justice is an alternative way of thinking about and doing justice with ancient roots in indigenous populations around the world. This course examines restorative justice in a prison setting from an encounter framework engaging students who are prisoners and students who are not in reading, discussion, and dialogue about restorative justice. The course format is based on a restorative justice practice called “encounter” which creates a safe space for offenders, victims, and citizens to talk about how crime has affected their lives and what they need to repair the harm resulting from crime in concrete ways that “restore justice.” Students will be exposed to the academic literature on restorative justice within the framework of the encounter context. Students will be expected to discuss their own personal experiences with crime, to learn about historical and global practices, and to reflect, write, and discuss restorative ways of responding to crime, and to identify concrete ways to put this approach into action.

  
  • CRJS 4770 - Honors: Directed Reading

    3 credit hours
  
  • CRJS 4780 - Honors:Directed Study

    3 credit hours
  
  • CRJS 4790 - Criminal Justice Honors Thesis Supervision

    4 credit hours
  
  • CRJS 4800 - Forensic Science

    5 credit hours
    Study of the application of science to law and the criminal justice system. Overview of disciplines, theories, techniques and practices of which the field of forensic science is comprised.

  
  • CRJS 4810 - Murder Movies and Copycat Crime

    3 to 5 credit hours
    Examination of the relationship between crime, criminal justice, and popular culture with attention to the criminogenic and cathartic effects of film and media depictions of violent crime, specifically murder. Focus on the dynamics of moral panics and copycat crime, the reflexive relationship between media and crime, and the individual-social-cultural effects of violent images and artifacts.

  
  • CRJS 4850 - Forensic Science Lab

    3 credit hours
    Application of scientific methods and techniques to problems in the field of forensic science and crime scene investigation. Hands-on introduction to techniques used in the forensic science laboratory. Lab exercises involving a range of forensic science methods, techniques, and specializations including: evidence collection and handling, analysis of hair and fiber, trace evidence, toolmarks, blood stains and spatter patterns, gunshot residue, and other physical evidence, fingerprinting and fingerprint enhancement, footwear comparisons, forensic serology and toxicology, DNA analysis, firearms and questioned document examination. Registration restrictions may be bypassed by the department with permission of chair.

    Registration Restriction(s): BCJ and BS forensic science majors only
    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, CHEM 1500, PHYS 1050 or 1210, CRJS 4800
  
  • CRJS 4870 - Senior Synthesis

    3 to 5 credit hours
  
  • CRJS 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • CRJS 4950 - Internship

    1 to 10 credit hours
    Direct observation, supervised practical experience, and academic study in a selected law enforcement agency or organization in the criminal justice system. CR/F grading mandatory.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior or senior standing and departmental permission
  
  • CRJS 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • CRJS 4990 - Directed Research

    1 to 5 credit hours

Diagnostic Ultrasound

  
  • DIUS 3040 - Pathophysiology - Medical Imaging

    4 credit hours
    A conceptual approach to alterations in the structure and function that occur in human organ systems as a result of disease processes. The cellular, biological and/or genetic basis for these pathologies will be discussed.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 2200 and 2210
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • DIUS 3060 - Anatomical Cross-sections

    1 credit hour
    This course includes in-depth instruction in and use of medical terminology and relational aspects of cross-sectional anatomy. Anatomy and terminology of the abdomen, brain, and heart are discussed. Anatomy discussions will be supplemented through models, illustrations, image review, and hands-on activities. Students will be introduced to scanning sectional planes.

    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3520, DIUS 3310, DIUS 3320
    Terms Typically Offered: FQ
  
  • DIUS 3250 - Vascular Sonography I

    3 credit hours
    Introduction to the application of grayscale, color flow and Doppler sonography for the detection of cerebrovascular (CV) disease. Includes basic CV arterial anatomy, physiology, disease and treatment. Basic principles of other non-sonographic testing modalities will also be covered.

    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • DIUS 3260 - Vascular Sonography II

    4 credit hours
    Introduction to the application of grayscale, color flow and Doppler sonography for the detection of peripheral vascular (PV) disease in the lower extremities. Includes basic PV arterial and venous anatomy, physiology, disease and treatment. Basic principles of other nonsonographic testing modalities will also be covered.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3250
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3460
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • DIUS 3270 - Vascular Sonography III

    3 credit hours
    Introduction to the application of grayscale, color flow and Doppler sonography for the detection of upper extremity (UE) and abdominal vascular disease. Includes basic UE and abdominal arterial anatomy, physiology, disease and treatment. Basic principles of other nonsonographic testing modalities will also be covered.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3250, DIUS 3260
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3470
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • DIUS 3310 - Abdominal Sonography I

    3 credit hours
    Cross sectional anatomy of the abdominal organs and vessels, pelvic organs and the central nervous system and the normal ultrasound appearance of these structures. An introduction to the pathophysiology of the abdominal organs.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 2200, BIOL 2210
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • DIUS 3320 - Echocardiography I

    3 credit hours
    Application of gray-scale and color-flow sonography for the detection of cardiac disease in the adult population. Includes basic cardiac anatomy, physiology, disease and treatment. Gray scale pattern recognition and standardized views will be emphasized. Basic principles of other non-sonographic testing modalities will also be covered.

    Prerequisite Course(s): PHYS 1050, PHYS 1060
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • DIUS 3370 - Abdominal Sonography II

    4 credit hours
    Pathophysiology of abdominal organ systems evaluated by ultrasound and their sonographic and Doppler appearance. Introduction to hemodynamics of abdominal and vascular systems. Includes female pelvic pathologies. Integration of ultrasound physics, instrumentation, and principles.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3310
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3410
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • DIUS 3380 - OB-GYN Sonography

    4 credit hours
    Includes scanning techniques in second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Embryologic development of human organ systems and the placenta are reviewed. Includes measurements for gestational age of the fetus and ultrasound anatomic landmarks. Discusses abnormalities of fetal organ systems, the ultrasound findings, and differential diagnosis. Twinning and scanning multiple gestations are discussed. Includes chromosomes anomalies and currently used screening tests. Maternal disorders affecting fetal development are discussed. Placental pathologies and abnormal amniotic fluid volumes are discussed. The use of Doppler in obstetrical exams is discussed.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3310, DIUS 3370, DIUS 3410
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3400
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • DIUS 3400 - OB-GYN Lab

    1 credit hour
    Hands-on experience in scanning the female pelvis. Includes practice scanning obstetrical models and endocavitary simulation.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3310, DIUS 3370, DIUS 3410
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3380
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • DIUS 3410 - Abdominal Sonography Lab I

    1 credit hour
    Hands-on experience in scanning abdominal organ systems. Practice in modes of equipment operation and safety.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 2200, BIOL 2210
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3370
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • DIUS 3420 - Echocardiography Lab I

    1 credit hour
    Hands-on experience in the evaluation of sonographic appearances of the heart with real-time 2-D imaging, Doppler, and M-mode echocardiography. Practice in modes of equipment operation and safety.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3320,
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3600
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • DIUS 3430 - Echocardiography Lab II

    1 credit hour
    Continued hands-on experience in the evaluation of sonographic appearances of the heart with real-time 2-D imaging, Doppler, and M-mode echocardiography. Introduction to more advanced echocardiographic exams.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3420
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3610
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • DIUS 3460 - Vascular Lab I

    1 credit hour
    Hands-on experience in scanning the peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular systems. Practice in modes of equipment operation and safety.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3250
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3260
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • DIUS 3470 - Vascular Lab II

    1 credit hour
    Continued hands-on experience in scanning the peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular systems. Practice in scanning abdominal vasculature and evaluating the peripheral arterial system. Practice in non-imaging testing modalities of the vascular system. Includes hands-on experience with physiologic testing equipment.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3260, 3240
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3270
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • DIUS 3500 - Ultrasound Physics

    3 credit hours
    An introduction to ultrasound physics. Topics include the physics of pulsed ultrasound, including its production and detection by transducers; characteristics of pulses and sound beams; interaction of ultrasound with tissue, including attenuation, impedance, reflection, refraction, scattering and ranging; hemodynamics; the Doppler effect; introduction to ultrasonic instrumentation. Requisites may be bypassed with permission of the diagnostic ultrasound department.

    Prerequisite Course(s): PHYS 1060 or equivalent; MATH 1230 or 1334; enrollment in diagnostic ultrasound program
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): PHYS 1060
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • DIUS 3600 - Echocardiography II

    4 credit hours
    Application of Doppler and grayscale sonography in the detection of the more common cardiovascular diseases present in the adult population. Includes advanced hemodynamics, physiology, diagnosis and treatment. Primary focus on coronary artery disease, valvular lesions, cardiomyopathies and left ventricular dysfunction. Includes a discussion of the complementary use of other non-sonographic testing modalities.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3320
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3420
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • DIUS 3610 - Echocardiography III

    4 credit hours
    Continued discussions of advanced hemodynamics in the evaluation of valvular lesions and left ventricular dysfunction in the adult population. Introduction to the detection of cardiovascular disease in the pediatric population. Innovative sonographic modalities will also be discussed. Continued discussion of the use of grayscale and Doppler sonography in the evaluation of the heart and the correlation with non-sonographic testing modalities.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3600
    Co-requisite Course(s): DIUS 3430
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • DIUS 3700 - Global Perspectives of Healthcare

    4 credit hours
    Introduction to basic scientific writing, study design and critique, statistical analysis, and formulation and testing of hypotheses. Examination of ethical, legal, and psycho-social aspects of health care. Methods of budgeting, hiring, firing, and departmental administration. The sonographer’s role in relation to the patient, physician, and staff. Fulfills interdisciplinary core requirement. Open to all qualified majors.

    Registration Restriction(s): Non-majors by instructor permission
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • DIUS 3750 - Ultrasound Instrumentation

    4 credit hours
    Understanding the operation of diagnostic ultrasound equipment, including B-mode, M mode, 2-D/realtime and Doppler systems, quality assurance, and safety.

    Prerequisite Course(s): DIUS 3500
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
 

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