Jul 23, 2024  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

University Honors

Students registering for these courses must have been admitted to the University Honors Program or have written permission from the program director.

  
  • HONR 3000 - Global Engagement Seminar

    4 credit hours
    In this seminar, students focus on an international problem or a social problem with global ramifications. It asks students to analyze the historical roots of this problem and devise possible solutions to it and/or ways of mitigating its effects. The course would have different emphases depending on the specialties of the instructors (e.g., “Genocide in the Modern World” or “Revolution in the Modern World”).

  
  • HONR 3100 - Religion in the Contemporary World

    4 credit hours
    This seminar asks students to reflect on questions of meaning, spirituality, values, and ethics within the context of the contemporary world and the challenges we face in it. The course would have different emphases depending on the specialties of the instructors (e.g., “Religion and Science” or “Spirituality, East and West”).

  
  • HONR 3960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Private work by arrangement. Prerequisite: approval of program director.

  
  • HONR 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Private work by arrangement. Prerequisite: approval of program director.


University Sponsored Academic Program

  
  • USAP 1000 - Introduction to Seattle University

    2 credit hours
    For incoming students, this course serves as an introduction to university-level academic standards, expectations related to critical reading and writing, and student-success resources available across the university. The course also provides students with an opportunity to inventory their own skills in the contest of learning about Jesuit education and Ignatian pedagogy.

    For freshmen and transfer students during their first year of attendance.


Web Application and Technology Studies

  
  • WATS 3000 - Foundations of the Web

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - WATS 1000
    In this introduction to the Internet and World Wide Web, students will increase their understanding of how the Internet works, how the Web works, how to be more savvy users of the Web, and how to begin the journey from Web consumer to Web creator. This is a general survey course that does not try to teach any technical concepts in depth.

  
  • WATS 3010 - Introduction to Web Development

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - WATS 1010
    This course introduces students to the basic principles of web Development beginning with an introduction to HTML and CSS. Students will learn how to create static pages and how to implement designs consistent with web Standards and best practices. Students will also learn about tools to give them feedback on the quality of their HTML and CSS in order to insure accessibility and accuracy. Finally, students will practice techniques to insure consistency of presentation across different client browsers.

    Co-requisite Course(s): WATS 3000
  
  • WATS 3020 - Intro to Javascript Programming for the Web

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - WATS 1020
    The code that executes in a user’s Web browser can be a powerful feature of any website or application. This course introduces students to concepts of Javascript programming such as progressive enhancement of content, detecting and altering content to enhance cross-browser experiences, improving usability of forms, validating data from the user, and more.

    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): WATS 3000, WATS 3010
  
  • WATS 3030 - Introduction to Servers and Hosting

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - WATS 1030


    This course introduces students to common solutions for hosting Websites and Web-based applications. Students will learn about how a server works, experiment with local Web servers, and engage with the world of Web hosting services in order to understand how those systems work in the professional world. Students will also gain an understanding of principles at work in cloud-based hosting solutions.



    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): WATS 3000

  
  • WATS 4000 - Building Javascript Applications for the Web

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - WATS 2000
    Client-side applications have changed the way we interact with websites and our computers. This course explores the techniques used to present complex tools to the user including an exploration of client-side application frameworks, routing behaviors based on URL, event-based application design, and more.

    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): WATS 3000, WATS 3010, WATS 3020
  
  • WATS 4010 - User Science and Testing

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - WATS 2010
    Building a Website is both a technical task, and a rhetorical task. Using industry-standard techniques of usertesting, multivariate content testing, creating user personas and conducting alpha and beta feedback sessions, students will gather findings about how users interact with their Websites and applications in order to improve those interfaces. Students will also learn about federal and community standards around accessibility and how to create Websites that function well for a broad spectrum of individuals.

    Prerequisite Course(s): WATS 3020, WATS 3030
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): WATS 3000
  
  • WATS 4020 - Professional Practice

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - WATS 2020
    This course addresses the common working methodology seen in web development shops. Students engage in project management skills such as planning, scoping, estimating work, and prioritization. Students practice working in an Agile workflow using common tools of the trade to collaborate with each other and document their progress. This course is designed to equip students to work within the professional project frameworks of web-based software development.

    Prerequisite Course(s): WATS 3000
  
  • WATS 4030 - Web Development Capstone Project

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - WATS 2030
    The capstone project is made up of two components: Production and Analysis. The Production component consists of a significant, polished web-based project. The Analysis component consists of a written document that contextualizes the Production component’s significance in the landscape of web-based software and content. Students may choose to collaborate on the Production component as a team, but each individual writes an Analysis exhibiting a unique point of view. The capstone project will be presented in the context of an online portfolio the student can use to showcase their skills.

    Prerequisite Course(s): WATS 3000, WATS 3010, WATS 3020, WATS 4000
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): WATS 3030, WATS 4010, WATS 4020

Women and Gender Studies

  
  • WGST 2010 - Introduction to Women and Gender Studies

    5 credit hours
    Formerly - WGST 1010
    A survey of women in society and feminist methods and concepts. Major themes include identity, work, community, and citizenship as well as intersections between gender and race, class, age, nationality, ethnicity, and sexuality.

    Terms Typically Offered: fall
  
  • WGST 2020 - Introduction to LGBTQ Studies

    5 credit hours
    Introductory course in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Studies. Examines contributions to the field by scholars from a range of academic disciplines in the humanities, arts, and social sciences. Surveys a variety of methods these scholars have brought to the subject matter, and traces some of the ways that LGBTQ Studies have influenced cultural and social theory more broadly. Exploration of the historical, political, economic, and cultural context of LGBTQ identities, communities, and politics, and the social production of sexualities, policies, and communities, and the politics of sexualities. Uses interdisciplinary approaches that incorporate race, class, ability, and nation as analytical categories in conjunction with sexuality and gender to examine power and culture. LGBTQ Studies is inextricably linked to the social movements from which it emerged, and so we will critically examine LGBTQ activism and activist texts.

  
  • WGST 2910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • WGST 2960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • WGST 3710 - Feminist Theories

    5 credit hours
    In-depth study of key theorists, issues, themes and debates in past and current feminist theories, including critical race theory, postcolonial theory, modern and postmodern theories, with particular attention to intersections of gender with sexuality, race, national origin, and class, among others. Cross-listed with SOCL 4110.

    Terms Typically Offered: W
  
  • WGST 3711 - Queer Theory

    5 credit hours
    Exploration of the historical foundations and contemporary innovations of the interdisciplinary field known as “queer theory.” Beginning with foundational texts in the field, we will trace the development of queer theory as an intellectual tradition and political movement, paying particular attention to how these texts shed light on conceptions of identity and on the possibility of resisting contemporary forms of oppression. Exploration of themes including gender identities, sexualities, social practices, modes of belonging, queer bodies and queer desire, queer politics and activism, and queer modes of understanding time. Study of queer theory’s intersections with fields of study including feminism, critical race theory, Marxism, psychoanalysis, postrstructuralism, trans studies and disability studies. Exploration of how queer theory has been transformed by critiques from outside and within.

  
  • WGST 3720 - Feminist Methodologies

    5 credit hours
    Overview of modern philosophy of science as well as of traditional disciplinary methods and study of interdisciplinary feminist critiques of such methods. Analysis of methodological approaches to knowing the ‘other’ including participant observation, discourse and narrative analysis, etc.

    Terms Typically Offered: S
  
  • WGST 3840 - Contemporary Latin American Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of Latin American authors and contemporary issues affecting women, as they are reflected in literature. Special emphasis is given to the relationship between literature and social changes. Students will learn about politics, history, religion, social activism, and gender roles through course readings, videos, and class participation. Most of the literature included in the course is written by women; however, the course will also include major writers Julio Cortar, Jorge Luis Borges, Octavio Paz, Carlos Fuentes, and others.

    Terms Typically Offered: S
  
  • WGST 3880 - Emerging Subjectivities in Chicano Literature

    5 credit hours
    A study of established and emerging Chicana/o authors from the 1960’s to the present. Some of the following canonical authors will be included in the reading list: Tomas Rivera, Rolando Hinojosa, Helena Maria Viramontes, Denise Chavez, Cherrie Moraga, Alejandro Morales, Kathleen Alcala, Lucha Corpi, Benjamin Saenz, Demetria Martinez, Rigoberto Gonzalez, Franciso Alarcon, Norma Cantu.

    Terms Typically Offered: inactive
  
  • WGST 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • WGST 3960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • WGST 4010 - Women and Gender Studies Seminar

    5 credit hours
    Exploration of methods of various disciplines to understand gender, providing a truly interdisciplinary perspective on women’s issues. Synthesis of preceding work in the minor. Required for the women and gender studies minor.

    Registration Restriction(s): Senior standing, women studies majors or minors only
    Terms Typically Offered: S
  
  • WGST 4011 - The Utopian Imaginary

    5 credit hours
    This seminar is a study of society and justice through a critical analysis of historical utopian impulses, visionary fictions, social experiments, and radical possibilities with a focus on the U.S.

    Prerequisite Course(s): WGST 2010 or WGST 2020; WGST 3710 or WGST 3711
  
  • WGST 4460 - Transgender Studies

    5 credit hours
    This course is anchored in the emerging field of transgender studies and engages with the history, practices, and politics of identification with an emphasis on transgender and gender non-conforming experiences and ways of seeing. Transgender studies focuses on the intersection of bodies, experience, identification, desire, and institutional practices. Transgender studies is a critical engagement with the gender normalization, regulation, and surveillance that affects us all, but at the same time, it remains rooted in the lived experiences and material circumstances of transgender and gender-variant people.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior or Senior Standing
  
  • WGST 4770 - Honors: Directed Reading

    3 credit hours
  
  • WGST 4780 - Honors: Directed Study

    4 credit hours
  
  • WGST 4790 - Honors: Thesis Supervision

    3 credit hours
  
  • WGST 4800 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality Studies

    3 to 5 credit hours
    Offers an interdisciplinary and intersectional approach to analyzing how race, gender, sexuality, nation, class, physical ability, and other aspects of social location materially influence people’s lives nationally and globally.

    Terms Typically Offered: F, S
  
  • WGST 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • WGST 4950 - Internship

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Supervised service in which students apply and develop their skills as Women Studies majors/minors working for a business or non-profit institution or agency. Graded CR/F. Permission of the Women and Gender Studies Director.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior or senior standing
    Terms Typically Offered: F, W, S
  
  • WGST 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: F, W, S
 

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