Apr 14, 2024  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Art Digital Design

  
  • ARTD 2720 - Digital Media I for Print

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to the industry standard software Adobe Illustrator for the beginning digital designer. Projects will be presented with a focus on working with vector graphics, text, and bitmap images for print. Encouraging a practical approach to working with visual art and design, projects will move sequentially from Adobe Illustrator to InDesign in combination with Photoshop, as well as a technical introduction to the basics of RGB & CMYK pre-press formats. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Registration Restriction(s): Digital Design and/or Photography majors only
    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTD 2710, ARTD 2700
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • ARTD 2910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Special Topics

  
  • ARTD 3700 - Graphic Design I

    5 credit hours
    A digital studio class focusing on the fundamentals of graphic design. Students will address the work and thought process inherent in combining typography with image development. Emphasis on the creative problem solving process. Development of formal and technical skills as they relate to graphic design. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Registration Restriction(s): Digital Design majors only
    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTD 2700, ARTD 2710, ARTD 2720, and portfolio review
    Terms Typically Offered: Varies
  
  • ARTD 3750 - Digital Media II for Web

    5 credit hours
    Designed to introduce students to working with vector graphics and bitmap images for the web. Projects will introduce students to building web pages using both a Content Management System (CMS) and through coding HTML and CSS using within the Adobe’s Dreamweaver’s front-end developing space. Through readings, students will consider the ways in which web-based media has developed up to the present era, along the way exploring the difference of print and screen media and what it means to be living in the era of social media. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTD 2720
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • ARTD 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Special Topics

  
  • ARTD 4700 - Graphic Design II

    5 credit hours
    Intermediate to advanced level of Graphic design studio course. A continuation of concepts studied in Graphic Design I to include more in-depth study and specialized projects such as actual client projects, Service Learning group project and themed design exhibition. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Registration Restriction(s): Digital Design majors only
    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTD 3700
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • ARTD 4750 - Digital Media III: Motion Graphics

    5 credit hours
    Designed to introduce students to working with stop-motion and animation for both graphics and text. Students will study the history of animation for perspective and inspiration and will create works using Adobe’s Creative Suite tools, including Photoshop, After Effects, Audition, and Premiere Pro. Projects will be presented that develop software skills, although the primary focus will be on the artistic use of the tools rather than their pure practical application. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTD 3750
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ARTD 4760 - Digital Media III: Interactive Graphics

    5 credit hours
    Designed to introduce students to the internet as a medium for artistic exploration. Students will study the history of interactive art for perspective and inspiration and will create interactive works for the web. The course will focus on the Flash programming environment for point-and-click games and introduce the jQuery toolkit for coding interactivity using javaScript. Projects will be presented that develop software skills, although the primary focus will be on introducing concepts of interactivity within an artistic programming environment. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTD 3750
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ARTD 4790 - Portfolio Development

    5 credit hours
    Advanced level digital design studio course that prepares students for the professional side of design. Students learn to document and present a comprehensive professional portfolio. Course content covers all the practicalities of portfolio preparation, brand identity development, and resumé package building. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTD 3700
  
  • ARTD 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Special Topics

  
  • ARTD 4950 - Internship

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Supervised work experience or apprenticeship in specific area of study in the community. Graded CR/F.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior or senior standing; Digital Design majors only with permission of faculty advisor
    Terms Typically Offered: Varies

Art History

  
  • ARTH 2110 - Studies in Western Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval

    5 credit hours
    A thematic introduction to the architecture, sculpture, painting, and decorative arts of the cultures of the Ancient Near East and the West, ending ca. 1400. Attention will be given to developing skills of visual literacy; examining art historical methodologies; and exploring connections with history, philosophy, anthropology, theology, and other art forms. Experiential aspect of the course will include visits to local galleries and museums.

    Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring
  
  • ARTH 2120 - Studies in Western Art II: Renaissance to Modern

    5 credit hours
    A thematic introduction to the architecture, sculpture, painting, and decorative arts of the cultures of Europe and the Americas, beginning ca. 1400 and continuing into the 20th century. Attention will be given to developing skills of visual literacy; examining art historical methodologies; and exploring connections with history, philosophy, anthropology, theology, and other art forms. Experiential aspect of the course will include visits to local galleries and museums.

    Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring
  
  • ARTH 2130 - Global Topics in Art History

    5 credit hours
    A thematic course that addresses a topic or period of Art History outside of modern Europe or the West. This writing intensive course provides the opportunity for students to approach issues of global citizenship and the study of art through a cross-cultural lens. May be repeated if course topics are different.

    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • ARTH 2910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Special Topics

  
  • ARTH 3130 - Medieval Art

    5 credit hours
    Investigation of the production, function and reception of medieval art, focusing especially on Western Europe from c.800-1500 CE. The course is organized thematically, with a focus on the Medieval Church as the site of intersection for the aesthetic, symbolic, ideological, performative and didactic aspects of art. Topics include tradition and innovation; representations of class and gender; the medieval artist; cultural interaction; and the medieval sense of space/place.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH 2110 or equivalent strongly advised
  
  • ARTH 3140 - Visual Theology

    5 credit hours
    Explores humanity’s experience of the transcendent and sacred by learning to “read” the visual texts of religous myth, symbol, iconography and architecture from the Western and other traditions. Lecture course combines slide shows, reading and discussions, fieldtrips and creative projects.

  
  • ARTH 3400 - 19th Century Art

    5 credit hours
    Examination of European and American art from Neoclassicism through Post-Impressionism (1775-1905). Highlights connections with literature, history, and music. Readings emphasize new methodologies.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH 2120
  
  • ARTH 3410 - History of Modernism

    5 credit hours
    Focuses on visual strategies of modern European artists that respond to rapid social, political, technological and cultural change from the mid-nineteenth century into the 1930s. The course explores the transformative effect on art production and reception of such themes as: revolution, technology, politics, nationalism, markets, patronage and gender.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH 2120
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • ARTH 3420 - History of Photography

    5 credit hours
    An exploration of the history and idea of photography from its emergence in the 19th century into the mid-twentieth century. The course begins with early conceptions of “fixing the image” and focuses on changing technologies as they impacted the meaning of photography itself. The course is organized thematically to cover the most important developments in the medium, always with a focus on how photography is understood by contemporaries and with attention to its social and cultural impact.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH 2120 or equivalent strongly advised
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter or Spring
  
  • ARTH 3430 - Dandies and Dangerous Women: Decadence and Symbolism around 1900

    5 credit hours
    An interdisciplinary course examining Symbolist and Decadent Art from the end of the 19th century through the lens of the colorful characters, the dandy and the femme fatale. The course brings historical, psychological and theoretical approaches to bear on 19th -century fears about society’s decay and the impact of this upon representations of gender and sexuality. Registration restrictions may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Registration Restriction(s): Juniors or Seniors only
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ARTH 3440 - History of Design

    5 credit hours
    The course provides students with the knowledge and understanding of the places, people, events, historical and cultural factors, and technological innovations that have influenced the development of graphic design into the practice that it is today. Historical awareness provides a meaningful context for the study and practice of digital design.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH 2110 or ARTH 2120 Strongly Advised
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ARTH 3500 - Art Since 1945

    5 credit hours
    Focuses on the major practices that challenged the legacy of European modernism and lead the way to new conceptions of art in the present moment. Explores styles and issues such as abstract expressionism, pop art, minimalism, land art, conceptualism, site-specificity, photography and identity politics, the postmodern turn and art in the era of globalization. Also examines significant debates in art criticism that continue to frame the discussion of art today. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH 2120
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • ARTH 3510 - Trauma, Image, Text: History and Representation After WW2

    5 credit hours
    An interdisciplinary course examining how writers and artists examined the role of images in culture in response to traumatic events such as the Holocaust, the threat of the Atom bomb and terrorism. Can art and literature adequately portray the traumatic reality of history and how have artists and writers struggled with this question in forms as diverse as the novel, photography, painting, film and video? Working back and forth between literature, images, and theory, discussion focuses around responses to the Holocaust and the controversies of the Cold War and 1960s America. Registration restrictions may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior or Senior standing
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • ARTH 3610 - Art Traditions of Japan

    5 credit hours
    A selective survey of major developments in Japanese painting, sculpture, ceramics, and prints, focusing on the Heian through Meiji periods. Examines the arts as a form of cultural expression and historical document. Attention to aesthetic traditions, narrative content, artistic techniques, and issues of connoisseurship.

  
  • ARTH 3620 - Arts of China

    5 credit hours
    A chronological survey of the major artistic traditions of China. In addressing China’s four-thousand year tradition of art production, particular attention is paid to traditions of landscape painting and Buddhist art and ceramics. Students are encouraged to relate the visual record of China to the vast textual history at their disposal.

  
  • ARTH 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Special Topics

    Terms Typically Offered: Varies
  
  • ARTH 4110 - Senior Synthesis: Theory and Methods in Art History

    5 credit hours
    The theory and methods seminar is the capstone course for Art History Majors. Students explore many of the methodologies employed by art historians to understand works of art. By engaging with the questions and debates that have shaped the field of art history, students attempt to understand how the discipline itself is part of historical processes. Through critical reading, writing and reflective response, students not only investigate art history’s history but also begin to articulate their own positions and voices. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH 2110 or ARTH 2120 and one (1) 3000- level course in art history
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • ARTH 4600 - Art History Seminar

    5 credit hours
    An advanced research seminar that builds on disciplinary skills learned in 2000-3000 level courses by engaging in an in-depth exploration of an issue, period, movement, or artist. Particular topic varies from year to year. Employs a seminar format to analyze current research in the discipline and to produce original student research of the highest quality. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH 2110 or ARTH 2120 and one 3000- level course in art history
  
  • ARTH 4610 - Robots, Machines and the Body in Avant-Garde Art in the 1920s and 30s

    5 credit hours
    An in-depth investigation of radical vanguard art, artists and movements from 1900 until about 1939. The course approaches this period by foregrounding fantasies and fears about the intersection between machines and human beings. Students focus on such themes as: the history of the automaton, utopian visions of machines, modern notions of the body beautify, the “new woman,” the menacing machine and the robot as fantasy and nightmare. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH-2110 or 2120 and
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ARTH 4620 - Space and Site in Contemporary Art

    5 credit hours
    An in-depth investigation of the emergence of art practices based on the viewer’s participation and interaction with the art work as part of an installation, environment or experience. Focuses on art since the 1960s by exploring the relationships between the art object and the spaces and sites of display in relation to theories of space and place, postmodernism, globalization and the everyday. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTH 2110 or 2120 and one (1)
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ARTH 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Special Topics

    Terms Typically Offered: Varies
  
  • ARTH 4950 - Internship

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Supervised work experience or apprenticeship in specific area of study in the community. Graded CR/F.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior or senior standing; Open only to Art History majors with permission of faculty advisor
  
  • ARTH 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours

Arts Leadership

  
  • ARTL 1000 - Introduction to Arts Leadership

    5 credit hours
    This course is an introduction to the field of arts administration, its history, current business practices and career opportunities. The focus will be on the leadership techniques needed to be an arts administrator, concentrating on management issues and business operations. Various aspects of the arts such as staffing financing, economic impact and application, marketing, fundraising and governance are covered.

    Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Winter
  
  • ARTL 2000 - Financial Strategies in the Arts

    5 credit hours
    Finance is the art and science of managing money. This course provides an understanding of the financial system, its functions, and available alternatives for obtaining money in an arts environment. Discussions will focus on understanding and interpreting financial information for the stakeholders of arts organizations. The types of financing that apply to nonprofit organizations will be discussed. This course will apply the tools of the financial manager as a decision-maker of the organization. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTL 1000
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • ARTL 2100 - Marketing the Arts

    5 credit hours
    Students analyze an arts, entertainment, media, or event organization within its environmental context to determine how to position it in the marketplace. Students develop an understanding of the consumer and market, choose proper research techniques to solve problems, determine appropriate promotional techniques to develop relationships with customers, and develop a complete and integrated marketing plan for an organization. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTL 1000
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • ARTL 2910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ARTL 3000 - Law and the Arts

    5 credit hours
    Course enables students to better understand legal issues in business dealings in the arts and entertainment industries and to recognize where legal problems may arise. Course work includes readings and lectures relating to copyright and other intellectual property rights, contracts, licensing agreements, first amendment issues, agency agreements, and the formation of partnerships and corporations. Registration restrictions may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTL-1000
    Terms Typically Offered: Varies
  
  • ARTL 3100 - Resource Development for Arts Organizations

    5 credit hours
    Course provides an overview of basic fund-raising techniques for non-profit arts organizations. Strategies for raising funds from individuals, corporations, foundations, and government funding sources are reviewed and analyzed. Methodologies for developing a complete fund-raising plan are studied. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.



    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTL 1000
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring

  
  • ARTL 3910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • ARTL 4000 - Public Policy and Advocacy in the Arts

    5 credit hours
    Students are introduced to the purpose, principles, and practices of advocacy as part of the democratic process, particularly as it applies to non-profit arts organizations. Instruction reviews the political structures within arts advocates’ work, with an emphasis on Washington state government. Students are armed with the tools to participate effectively in making the arts a public policy priority and to learn how to use lobbying to defend the interests of non-profit and commercial arts organizations. Students are linked with organizations and individuals engaged in arts advocacy and are provided with an opportunity to lobby at the state government level. Registration restrictions may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTL-1000
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ARTL 4900 - Arts Entrepreneurship/Senior Synthesis

    5 credit hours
    This senior capstone course integrates the university core curriculum with personal and professional development in the arts. This course provides students with the knowledge to determine the suitability of starting and running a business of their choice; measure their expectations with practical aspects of running a business; formulate a step-by-step approach for conceiving, executing, and launching a business venture; and develop skills in finance, employee relations, and marketing. This course focuses on the concepts, skills, expertise, information, attitudes, controls, and rewards of entrepreneurship. Students learn to recognize opportunities and act on them. Registration restrictions may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Registration Restriction(s): Senior standing and eligibility for graduation
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • ARTL 4910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: Varies
  
  • ARTL 4950 - Arts Leadership Internship

    1 to 5 credit hours
    Integrates and applies the arts administration theories being learned in the course work with the realities of the workplace. This internship provides students the opportunity to apply their knowledge in resource development, arts marketing, audience development and general management to actual positions within Puget Sound arts organizations.

    Prerequisite Course(s): ARTL-1000
    Terms Typically Offered: Varies
  
  • ARTL 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours

Asian Studies

  
  • AIST 2000 - Introduction to Asian Studies

    5 credit hours
    A major requirement introducing the main themes and eras in the field of Asian studies; intended to prepare students for continuing studies in the discipline.

    Terms Typically Offered: 18WQ
  
  • AIST 2910 - Special Topics

    3 to 5 credit hours
  
  • AIST 2960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • AIST 3250 - Asian Families and Culture

    5 credit hours
    Families and households are at the foundation of all societies and cultures. This course focuses on families and house-holds in Japan and the Peoples Republic of China as well as the families and households of Asians who have immigrated to the United States. Course work includes site visits and a life history interview of an Asian elder. Cross-listed with ANTH 3320.

    Terms Typically Offered: 18FQ
  
  • AIST 3350 - Contemporary Chinese Popular Culture

    5 credit hours
    This course focuses on contemporary Chinese pop culture of which 500 million strong Chinese youth and the burgeoning middle class are not only its consumers but also the driving force to determine the currently second largest economy’s approach to the world. By looking at the multi-facets of this powerful group through the pop and consumer culture, students are offered a refreshing departure from the unilateral perspective of China’s rise as a competition in order to discover new opportunities to engage China in shaping a safer and more prosperous world.

    Terms Typically Offered: 18WQ
  
  • AIST 3910 - Special Topics

    3 to 5 credit hours
  
  • AIST 3960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • AIST 4650 - East Asian Political Economy

    5 credit hours
    This course explores key issues related to the political economy of several major East Asian countries, namely Japan, Koreas, China (including Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan) from both comparative and international political economy perspectives. In particular, this course investigates the economic, political and social strategies and institutional foundations of these economies. In doing so, we examine major contending explanations and debates for East Asia’s high growth, as well as the region’s financial downfalls. While we will consider similarities and differences in these countries’ experiences of economic development and examine some of the challenges facing each economy today, we will also examine the interactions of East Asia with other regions of the world. Cross-listed with PLSC 4650.

    Terms Typically Offered: 18SQ, 17SQ
  
  • AIST 4800 - The Asian American Experience: Culture, History, and Community

    5 credit hours
    This course will examine the transplanting of cultural values in a new land, and the means by which Asian American communities have expressed themselves in social organization and urban form. While the focus of this course will be on the early history and development of Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino American communities, broader events in American and Asian history will provide a framework for our study. Readings, discussions, and field visits throughout the term will draw from the fields of history, urban planning, architecture, sociology, political science, and Asian American literature.

    Terms Typically Offered: 19WQ, 18SQ
  
  • AIST 4900 - Senior Capstone in Asian Studies

    5 credit hours
    Terms Typically Offered: 19WQ
  
  • AIST 4910 - Special Topics

    3 to 5 credit hours
  
  • AIST 4960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours

Biology

A minimum grade of C (2.00) is required for any Biology course that serves as a prerequisite for another Biology course.

  
  • BIOL 1010 - Principles of Biology

    5 credit hours
    Important areas of biology, beginning at the cellular level and culminating with a consideration of interactions and changes in natural populations. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Credits not applicable to biology major.

  
  • BIOL 1100 - Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to basic life processes at the cellular and molecular level, and will introduce you to those aspects of cell structure and function that are common to all living organisms. Four lecture hours and 2 discussion hours per week.

     

    Registration Restriction(s): Nursing majors only
    Prerequisite Course(s): CHEM1200 or CHEM1500/1501 with C or better
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter

  
  • BIOL 1200 - Principles of Anatomy & Physiology I

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to major structural and functional systems of the human body: Cells, tissue, bone, muscle, and nervous system. Four lecture hours and 2 discussion hours per week.

     

    Registration Restriction(s): Nursing majors only
    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1100 or BIOL 1610/1611 (with C or better), and CHEM 1200 or CHEM 1500/1501
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring

  
  • BIOL 1210 - Principles of Anatomy and Physiology II

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to major structural and functional systems of the human body. Digestive, circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and reproductive systems. Physiological interactions among systems. Four lecture hours and 2 discussion hours per week.

     

    Registration Restriction(s): Nursing majors only
    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1200 with C or better
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall

  
  • BIOL 1610 - Biology I: Molecular and Cellular Biology

    4 credit hours
    Survey of the biological world, concepts and principles. I) cell biology, metabolism, respiration, photosynthesis, genetics and molecular biology. Four lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): high school chemistry and placement into MATH 1021 or higher
    Co-requisite Course(s): BIOL 1611
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Winter
  
  • BIOL 1611 - Biology Lab I

    1 credit hour
    In addition to illustrating the material from the lecture sessions, the laboratory sessions in the series are an introduction to basic laboratory procedures and practices for scientific inquiry. Students will work on developing observational skills, collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data, experimental design, and presentation of experimental results. Three hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): high school chemistry and placement into MATH 1021 or higher
    Co-requisite Course(s): BIOL 1610
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Winter
  
  • BIOL 1620 - Biology II: Evolution and Ecology

    4 credit hours
    Survey of the biological world, concepts and principles. II) evolution, population genetics, ecology, diversity, and comparisons of groups of living organisms. Four lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611 with C or better
    Co-requisite Course(s): BIOL 1621
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter, Spring
  
  • BIOL 1621 - Biology Lab II

    1 credit hour
    In addition to illustrating the material from the lecture sessions, the laboratory sessions in the series are an introduction to basic laboratory procedures and practices for scientific inquiry. Students will work on developing observational skills, collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data, experimental design, and presentation of experimental results. Three hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611 with C or better
    Co-requisite Course(s): BIOL 1620
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter, Spring
  
  • BIOL 1630 - Biology III: Physiology and Development

    4 credit hours
    Survey of the biological world, concepts and principles. III) structures and functions of tissues and organ systems, and development of animals and plants. Four lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611 with C or better
    Co-requisite Course(s): BIOL 1631
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring, Fall
  
  • BIOL 1631 - Biology III Lab

    1 credit hour
    In addition to illustrating the material from the lecture sessions, the laboratory sessions in the series are an introduction to basic laboratory procedures and practices for scientific inquiry. Students will work on developing observational skills, collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data, experimental design, and presentation of experimental results. Three hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611 with C or better
    Co-requisite Course(s): BIOL 1630
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring, Fall
  
  • BIOL 1910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • BIOL 1960 - Independent Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • BIOL 2200 - Anatomy and Physiology I

    5 credit hours
    Major structural and functional systems of the human body. Cells, tissue, bone, muscle, and nervous system. Laboratory emphasis on microscopic and gross anatomy. Credits not applicable to any BS in biology major. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611 (with C or better), CHEM 1500/1501 (with C- or better)
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOL 2210 - Anatomy and Physiology II

    5 credit hours
    Major structural and functional systems of the human body. Digestive, circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and reproductive systems. Physiological interactions among systems. Laboratory emphasis on physiology. Credits not applicable to a BS in biology major. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 2200 (with C or better)
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • BIOL 2220 - Principles of Microbiology

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to microbiology, emphasizing health-related aspects. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Credits not applicable to a BS in biology major. Requisites may be bypassed by the department with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1100 or BIOL 1610/1611 (with C or better); CHEM 1200 or CHEM 1500/1501
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOL 2350 - Invertebrate Zoology

    5 credit hours
    Survey of invertebrate phyla including their anatomy, morphology, taxonomy, and ecology. Four lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better)
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOL 2360 - Marine Invertebrate Zoology

    5 credit hours
    Survey of invertebrate biological concepts concentrating on marine ecosystems. Stress on the importance of invertebrates to nutrient cycles, diversity and unique physiologies are stressed.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better). (summer at Blakely Island Field Station)
    Terms Typically Offered: Summer at Blakely Island Field Station
  
  • BIOL 2520 - Plant Systematics

    5 credit hours
    Plant systematics surveys the phylogeny (including methods of phylogenetic inference), evolution, ecology, paleobotany, and taxonomy of plants while emphasizing native flora. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. One weekend field trip is required.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better)
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOL 2530 - Marine Botany

    5 credit hours
    Study of the major marine flora and their impacts on marine and terrestrial systems.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better). (summer at Blakely Island Field Station)
    Terms Typically Offered: Summer at Blakely Island Field Station
  
  • BIOL 2600 - Ecology

    5 credit hours
    Explores patterns and processes in nature by studying population, community, and ecosystem dynamics through introducing foundational theories and modeling techniques. Combines lectures with field laboratories at local sites for team research that develops into independent projects. Includes all elements of research, from generating hypotheses to proposing and carrying out research to analyzing and writing up results. Demonstrate proficiency through writing, presenting, and taking exams. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better).
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • BIOL 2700 - Genetics

    5 credit hours
    Introduction to the principles of inheritance with an emphasis on the transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next. Topics include Mendelian and non Mendelian inheritance, dominance, linkage, gene interactions, sex determination and sex linkage, polygenic inheritance, human medical genetics, maternal effects, and molecular biology. Requisites may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better)
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring
  
  • BIOL 2730 - Bioinformatics

    5 credit hours
    A skills-based course focused on learning the tools that apply computer technology to the management of biological information. The course provides an introduction to computer programming as a tool for cellular and molecular biologists and is a core course for the major in Cell and Molecular Biology (BS.CMOL). Registration restrictions may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Registration Restriction(s): BA.BIOL, BS.BIOL, BS.CMOL, BS.MCON major
    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 2700
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • BIOL 2750 - Biotechnology

    4 credit hours
    Approaches in biotechnology, including recombinant DNA techniques, protein analyses, and computational tools for data analysis. This class is the initial core course for the major in Cell and Molecular Biology. Requisites may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Registration Restriction(s): Biology major with GPA of at least 2.80
    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better); BIOL 2700 (with C+ or better); CHEM 1520
    Co-requisite Course(s): BIOL 2751
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOL 2751 - Biotechnology Laboratory

    2 credit hours
    Current methods in biotechnology. This course is the initial core laboratory experience for the major in Cell and Molecular Biology.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better); BIOL 2700 (with C+ or better); CHEM 1520; Biology Major GPA of at least 2.8
    Co-requisite Course(s): BIOL 2750
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOL 2910 - Special Topics

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • BIOL 2960 - Directed Study

    1 to 5 credit hours
  
  • BIOL 3100 - Microbiology

    5 credit hours
    Basic biology of microorganisms, including morphology, physiology, genetics, and ecology, with some aspects of applied and medical microbiology. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better)
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): CHEM 2500/2501
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOL 3150 - Virology

    5 credit hours
    General aspects of viruses including structure, genetics and replication. Study will focus on relevant viruses important for understanding lifecycles,human and animal disease and immune system interactions. Broader implications such as vaccine development and gene therapy will be discussed. Four lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better); CHEM 1520; BIOL 2700 recommended
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOL 3250 - Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates

    5 credit hours
    Comparative study of the structures of the integumentary, muscular, skeletal, digestive, respiratory, excretory, reproductive, circulatory, and nervous systems of selected vertebrates with emphasis on evolutionary relationships between organisms. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better)
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • BIOL 3300 - Developmental Biology

    5 credit hours
    Early embryo development with consideration of gametogenisis, fertilization, gastrulation, cell differentiation, and organogenesis. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better)
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOL 3310 - Ultrastructure

    4 credit hours
    The examination of cellular structure as seen through the electron microscope. Introduction to theory of operation of the electron microscope, interpretation of electron micrographs, comparisons of fine structure of different cell types, correlations of structures with cellular functions, examples of research applications. Lecture/demonstration format; three lectures and one demonstration period per week. Requisites may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better)
  
  • BIOL 3400 - Epidemiology & Public Health

    3 credit hours
    Introduction to the discipline of epidemiology and it relationship to the field of public health. A survey of the various sub-disciplines of epidemiology and the research methods used in the field.

    Registration Restriction(s): Junior standing
    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 2700 (with C or better); MATH 1021
  
  • BIOL 3500 - Evolution

    5 credit hours
    Natural and sexual selection, evolutionary genetics, phylogenetics and macroevolution, evolution and health, and special topics. The course format includes lectures, discussions, and original laboratory research, in which students design and conduct experiments and write scientific papers on evolutionary studies. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better)
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • BIOL 3650 - Marine Biology

    5 credit hours
    Study of the marine environment and the animals and plants inhabiting it. Three lectures and one laboratory per week and one weekend field trip.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better). BIOL 2350 recommended.
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOL 3750 - Molecular Biology Projects Lab

    5 credit hours
    Application of molecular techniques to biological questions. Theory and use of molecular biology methods and study of molecular approaches in current research. Emphasis on experimental design, data interpretation, and development of an independent project. Two lecture and six laboratory hours per week. Requisites may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Registration Restriction(s): CMOL major
    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 2750/2751 with B or better; CHEM 1520
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • BIOL 3760 - Protein Project Laboratory

    5 credit hours
    Research-based independent projects that focus on the analysis of proteins. Requisites may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Registration Restriction(s): CMOL major
    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 2750/2751 with B or better; CHEM 1520
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • BIOL 3770 - Bioinformatics Project Lab

    5 credit hours
    The study of how large data sets from biology, molecular biology and protein biochemistry are used to understand how biological processes function. Integration of computer science and natural sciences is stressed. Three lecture hours combined with computer laboratory per week. Requisites may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Registration Restriction(s): CMOL major
    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 2730; CHEM 1520
  
  • BIOL 3800 - Animal Behavior

    5 credit hours
    Course goals include gaining a broad understanding and an increased fascination for why animals behave as they do, and the skill to create and answer questions in this field of biology. The course examines how genetics, development, ecology and evolution shape behaviors including communication, choosing mates, avoiding predators, finding food, and social interactions. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week. One weekend field trip.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better)
    Terms Typically Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOL 3820 - Neurobiology

    5 credit hours
    Study of neurochemistry/molecular neuroscience, sensory and motor systems and behavior as it pertains to the human brain. Four lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Requisites may be bypassed with permission of the department.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better); CHEM 1520
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • BIOL 3850 - Plant Physiology

    5 credit hours
    Study of the function of plants, with emphasis on the wide range of physiological process that may contribute to success and survival of plants in their environment. Transport mechanisms; water and mineral management; responses to light, including photosynthesis, photoperiodism, and photomorphogenesis; functions of plant hormones; responses to environmental stresses; events in development. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Individual project.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631, 2700 (all with C or better)
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite Course(s): CHEM 2500/2501
    Terms Typically Offered: Winter
  
  • BIOL 3880 - Animal Physiology

    5 credit hours
    Study of the function of animals, with emphasis on processes that contribute to the success and survival of animals in their respective environments. Nerve and muscle function, hormonal regulation, osmoregulation, digestion, gas exchange, and thermoregulation. Four lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better); CHEM 2510/2511
    Terms Typically Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOL 3890 - Environmental Physiology

    5 credit hours
    Physiological responses of individuals to the environment. Topics covered will include circadian rhythms and responses to various stressors (e.g., light, heat, salinity, climate change, hypoxia).

    Prerequisite Course(s): BIOL 1610/1611, 1620/1621, 1630/1631 (all with C or better); CHEM 2510/2511; MATH 1210
    Terms Typically Offered: Summer at Blakely Island Field Station
 

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