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  Jul 25, 2017
 
 
    
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2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

The University Core Curriculum



Jeffrey S. Philpott, PhD, Director

“A Jesuit liberal arts education assumes that you become what you desire. All the courses in art and literature, in mathematics and science, in history, economics or business, in philosophy or theology aim at helping you clarify, broaden, and deepen your most important question in life: ‘What do you really want?’ When that question is deepened, most of us discover that what we really want is the knowledge, skills, and power to build a world of justice and love.”

—John Topel, S.J.

Objectives

Students at Seattle University take a basic program of liberal studies called the University Core Curriculum. The University Core Curriculum introduces all Seattle University students to the unique tradition of Jesuit liberal education. The curriculum results from four years of discussion and work by more than 100 faculty members and administrators in response to a call by students and teachers for an integrated way of learning. In accord with Seattle University’s Mission Statement, the Core Curriculum has three aims:

  • To develop the whole person for a life of service
  • To provide a foundation for questioning and learning in any major or profession throughout one’s entire life
  • To give a common intellectual experience to all Seattle University students

This University Core Curriculum has several distinctive characteristics:

  • It provides an integrated freshman year for all students.
  • It gives order and sequence to student learning.
  • It provides experience in the methods and content of the range of liberal arts, sciences, philosophy, and theology.
  • It calls in all classes for active learning, for practice in writing and thinking, and for an awareness of values.
  • It encourages a global perspective, an intercultural and gender awareness, and a sense of social and personal responsibility.

The University Core Curriculum provides this ordered experience in three phases.

Phase One: Foundations of Wisdom

The first phase gives a student the basis to move from experience to understanding and then to critical judgment and responsible choices. The goal of this first phase is to develop several foundations of liberal learning:

  • Foundational Habits—Facility in asking the right questions, in critical and creative thinking, in writing and speaking skills, and in mathematical literacy.
  • Foundations of Culture—Familiarity with the basic ways of knowing through a study of Western and other civilizations, primarily in their history, literature, science, and fine arts.

Phase Two: Person in Society

The second phase helps a student to expand horizons by confronting major modern issues. Here the student learns to interpret and to make judgments through the methods used in the human sciences, philosophy, and religious studies. Building on the foundational skills and awareness of literature, history, science, and fine arts (from Phase One), the student delves into the issues and questions raised by anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology, discovering philosophical and theological assumptions underlying the commonalities and differences of human experience in society today.

Phase Three: Responsibility and Service

The third phase is designed to help the student prepare more directly for a life of service in the light of authentic human and Christian values. The first course in this phase is an ethics course, which is followed by a second theology course. In addition, the student takes one interdisciplinary course that addresses a major contemporary problem from a number of approaches. Finally, the student concludes his or her university education with a senior synthesis, which ties together liberal learning with professional studies. What is special about Phase Three is its emphasis on evaluative activities that are an essential part of responsible service.

The University Core Curriculum Requirements: First-time Students or Students Transferring with Fewer than 45 credits


(prior to first attendance at Seattle University)

Additional requirements, exceptions, and stipulated courses are established by the schools and departments of the university and those sections of this Catalog should be consulted before choosing core courses. Check course descriptions in the respective departmental sections for prerequisites. All courses fulfilling core requirements must be taken for a letter grade. For each student, no individual course may fulfill more than one Core Curriculum requirement.

The two sequences in Phase One must normally be completed before taking courses in Phase Two. All of Phase Two must be completed before a student begins Phase Three. Exceptions to taking the Core Curriculum in sequence or in phases must have permission of the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences or the director of the university Core Curriculum.

Some programs have specific requirements and special allowances for filling core. In some cases only the core interdisciplinary and/or senior synthesis may fulfill both core and major requirements. See individual program sections.

The following core requirements are in effect:

Phase One: Foundations of Wisdom


Writing/Thinking Sequence (10)


These two courses are normally to be taken in sequence in a 10-credit block during the fall and winter or winter and spring quarters of the freshman year.

History/Literature Sequence (10)


These two courses are normally taken in sequence or a cluster in a 10-credit correlated block during the winter and spring quarters of the freshman year. (Students in the College of Science and Engineering may take this sequence in spring of the first year and fall of the second year.)

NOTE:

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences must take HIST 120  for core and may select HIST 121  or HIST 231  to fill the additional college history requirement.

Mathematics


Any five-credit course in mathematics on the 100 level (or above) for which the student is qualified.

Phase Two: Person in Society


Study of Person Sequence (10)


Phase Three: Responsibility and Service


Interdisciplinary Course (3 to 5)


A three- to five-credit course that deals with a contemporary issue from a multidisciplinary perspective. A list of approved interdisciplinary courses will be published in the quarterly schedule of classes and will usually be numbered 480 to 484.

Senior Synthesis (3 to 5)


A course or project of at least three credits approved by the student’s major department and the Core Director as fulfilling the objectives of the senior synthesis requirement.

The University Core Curriculum Requirements: Students Transferring with 45-89 Credits


(prior to first attendance at Seattle University)

Students completing a first undergraduate degree who have fewer than 90 transfer credits will normally complete a minimum of 26 core credits at Seattle University: PHIL 210/220, THRS Phase II (200 level), THRS Phase III (300 level), interdisciplinary course, senior synthesis, and upper-division ethics.

Phase One: Foundations of Wisdom


College Writing (5)


NOTE:


Transfer courses can be used to satisfy the above requirements in Phase One with the categories below. Note that only two courses from any one category will be counted towards fulfillment of the above requirements in Phase One:

Communication, Journalism and Speech
English and Literature (no English composition)
Fine Arts, Art, Drama and Music (This category does not include skill and performance classes.)
History
Humanities
Philosophy
Religion

Modern Language and ASL classes do not fulfill Phase One course requirements.

Mathematics


Any five-credit course in mathematics on the 100-level or above for which the student is qualified, excluding intermediate algebra.

Science


Any five-credit laboratory science course for which the student is qualified (e.g., biology, chemistry, general science, physics, but not computer science).

Phase Two: Person in Society


Any two transfer courses from the following subjects and from different disciplines may satisfy Social Science I or II: anthropology, administrative justice/criminal justice, economics, geography, government/political science, psychology, and sociology. Students who major in one of the social science disciplines must take both the required Core Curriculum social science courses outside of their major disciplines.

Study of Person Sequence


PHIL 220  is only for students who have completed PHIL 110  at Seattle University.

Students who are not required to take Seattle University’s PHIL 110  will take PHIL 210  in place of PHIL 220 .

Theology and Religious Studies Phase Two (200 level)


Any approved five-credit course selected from THRS 200-299. (See Course Descriptions .)

Phase Three: Responsibility and Service


Theology and Religious Studies Phase Three (300 level)


Any approved five-credit course selected from THRS 300-399. (See Course Descriptions .)

Interdisciplinary Course (3 to 5)


Choose any three- to five-credit course that deals with a contemporary issue from a multidisciplinary perspective. A list of approved interdisciplinary courses will be listed in the online quarterly schedule of classes and usually will be numbered 480-484.

Senior Synthesis (3 to 5)


NOTE:


Students may elect to fulfill the college writing requirements through credit by examination. For students entering Seattle University as transfer students, the requirement of having 15 prior credits at Seattle University is waived for the purposes of this exam only.

A history course, in addition to the core requirements is required of all majors in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students may select HIST 121  or HIST 231  or equivalent.

Some programs have specific requirements and special allowances for filling core. See individual program sections.

It is recommended that the two sequences in Phase One and Phase Two be completed before a student begins Phase Three.

Essential Core for Transfer Students with 90 or More Credits


All students completing a first undergraduate degree who have 90 transfer credits or more, will normally complete a minimum of 21 core credits at Seattle University: PHIL 210 /PHIL 220 , THRS Phase II (200 level) (see Course Descriptions ), interdisciplinary course, senior synthesis, and upper-division ethics.

Transfer students who matriculate with 90 or more credits and who have not satisfied PHIL 110  with a transfer course will receive a waiver in PHIL 110 .

Students who transfer in with 90 credits or more will not be required to take a 300- level theology course.

Essential Core for Second Undergraduate Degree


For a student seeking a second baccalaureate degree, essential core to be completed at Seattle University is a minimum of 13 credits: a five-credit 200-level theology and religious studies course (see Course Descriptions ), senior synthesis appropriate to the new degree, a five-credit upper-division ethics course.

Thematic Options in the Core


The Core Curriculum offers students the option of fulfilling a portion of their core requirements by enrolling in one of three thematic tracks. These tracks, Core Honors (HONRC), Diversity, Citizenship, Social Justice (DCSJ), and Faith and the Great Ideas (F&GI) are described below.

Core Honors Track (HONRC)


Paul Kidder, PhD, Director

The core honors track consists of thematically linked, seminar sections of nine required core courses. Students enrolled in this track take one core honors course per quarter for their first three years. Open to students in all majors, core honors is ideal for students in the College of Nursing, the Albers School of Business and Economics, and the College of Science and Engineering, for whom the two-year university honors program might not be feasible due to specific major requirements. Participation in core honors is by invitation to selected students based upon review of the application for admission to the university.

Requirements


Students must successfully complete the core honors sections of the nine required courses. With permission of the director, students in some colleges and majors – particularly nursing, science, engineering, and diagnostic ultrasound – are permitted to take selected core honors courses out of sequence.

All students enrolled in core honors are required to take all of the courses in the track, regardless of Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate credit. This is to ensure the integrity of the core honors experience. In cases where a student received AP or IB credit for a particular course (ENGL 110 , College Writing, for example), that AP or IB credit is awarded as University elective credit.

First Year

Second Year

Spring

  • Core Honors section of Social Science*
Third Year

Fall

  • Core Honors section of Theology and Religious Studies Phase II
Winter

  •  Core Honors section of Ethics
Spring

  • Core Honors section of Theology and Religious Studies Phase III

NOTE:


*Seattle University core requirements not satisfied by completion of this track vary depending upon college and majors. For instance, the core honors social science course satisfies either Social Science I or Social Science II. For nursing students (who are required to take PSYC 120 ), the course satisfies Social Science II; for business students (who are required to take ECON 271 ), the course satisfies Social Science I. For engineering students, the course satisfies Social Science I; for science and arts and science students, the course satisfies either Social Science I or II, but not both.

Diversity, Citizenship, Social Justice Core Track (DCSJ)


Gabriella Gutierrez y Muhs, PhD, Director

This track aims to provide students an interdisciplinary approach to diversity, citizenship, and social justice and to bring them together in a community of professors and peers exploring similar issues through a 35-credit sequence of courses. Each quarter, SUOnline identifies core course sections associated with the DCSJ track and further identifies each course focus as diversity (DIV), citizenship (CITZ), or Social Justice (SOCJ).

Requirements


Students must take 35 credits of courses identified as part of the DCSJ track including at least one course in each area: (See Course Descriptions )

Diversity–DCSJ (5)
Citizenship–DCSJ (5)
Social Justice–DCSJ (5)
Core interdisciplinary course identified as DCSJ (5)
Other DCSJ courses (15)

For further information, please contact the director or visit the Core web site at www.seattleu.edu/core.

Faith and the Great Ideas Core Track (F&GI)


Heath A. Spencer, PhD, Director

The F&GI Academic Program consists of special sections of required core courses designed to give first-year students an integrated and coherent liberal arts education. Based on a model of the Jesuit intellectual tradition, the Program aims to assist its students in acquiring a strong foundation for any academic major or profession, a deeper intellectual awareness of moral values, a global perspective that takes seriously the relationship between faith and justice, a keener sense of personal freedom and responsibility, a critical understanding of the natural environment, and an engaging and comprehensive conversation with excellent teachers and scholars who study great thinkers, writers, and artists from ancient, medieval, and modern times.

Requirements


F&GI students who successfully complete any five of these special core courses receive a certificate of completion at the end of their freshman year.

As many as two transfer and/or Advanced Placement courses may apply toward completion of program requirements.

For further information or to apply for admission into the F&GI Program, please write to the program director of check the website: www.seattleu.edu/FaithGreatIdeas.

Students must successfully complete five F&GI designated sections of core courses. F&GI courses commonly include: